Digestion of Carbohydrates in Relation to Ph. Levels

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Digestive System Enzymes
Digestion of Carbohydrates in relation to Ph. levels

2012
HAUBER-SIX, Janina
Queensland Government
1/1/2012
Digestive System Enzymes
Digestion of Carbohydrates in relation to Ph. levels

2012
HAUBER-SIX, Janina
Queensland Government
1/1/2012

The follow experiment was prepared, conducted and analysed in order to test at which pH level starch will be digested at fastest. The digestive system is a complex network of organs as well as other structures which all work together to supply the body with the necessary nutrients and energy required. If problem occurs along the digestive tract the consequences can be fatal. Therefore it is extremely important to understand your body’s requirements and the way in which it functions, especially when engaging in one of the most crucial and rewarding activities; eating!

Name – Janina Hauber-Six
Grade – 10
Teacher - Mrs Lee – LEEGEO
Due Date – 26th November 2012
The follow experiment was prepared, conducted and analysed in order to test at which pH level starch will be digested at fastest. The digestive system is a complex network of organs as well as other structures which all work together to supply the body with the necessary nutrients and energy required. If problem occurs along the digestive tract the consequences can be fatal. Therefore it is extremely important to understand your body’s requirements and the way in which it functions, especially when engaging in one of the most crucial and rewarding activities; eating!

Name – Janina Hauber-Six
Grade – 10
Teacher - Mrs Lee – LEEGEO
Due Date – 26th November 2012

Contents Page
1.0 Introduction
1.1 Background Information
1.2 Mouth/Oesophegus
1.3 Stomach
1.4 Small Intestine
1.5Large Intestine
1.6Other Key Players
1.7Problems In the Digestive System
2.0 Aim

3.0 Hypothesis

4.0 Materials

5.0 Method

5.1 Making the Buffers

6.0 Results

7.0 Analysis/Discussion

8.0 Conclusion

9.0 Errors

10.0 Acknowledgements

11.0 Bibliography

12.0 Appendix

13.1 Log Book
1.0 Introduction
The human body is constantly working to remain healthy and functioning. In order to achieve this, the body needs a constant supply of energy as well as other vital nutrients. This is absorbed from the food we eat through a process called digestion. Digestion takes place in several organs with the help of enzymes and certain pH levels.

1.1 Background Information
This experiment has been constructed to test the effect of pH level on the reaction time of amylase breaking down starch. Amylase and glucoamylase are the enzymes present in human saliva used to begin the break down process of carbohydrates. When not enough of these enzymes are produced to regulate the decay of these foods, diastase, a natural form of amylase, helps in the process.(Grosz, 2012) pH levels of 1,4,7,9 and 14 will be tested. Based on research, it is predicted that the starch will be ‘digested’ fastest at the highest acidic levels due to the fact that the enzymes used in the stomach for digestion consist of pure acid.

1.2 Mouth/Oesophegus
Once food enters the mouth, teeth grind the food it into a soft paste while the tongue shapes it into a ball called a bolus for swallowing. Saliva at a pH of approximately 5.6 to 7.9 begins the digestion, chemically using special proteins called enzymes.(livestrong.com, 2012) These break down large molecules into smaller molecules that can be absorbed along the body’s digestive tract. Muscular contractions known as peristalsis along this tract, moves the food downward though the oesophagus and the lower oesophageal sphincter. This is a muscle which closes to ensure no food re-enters the oesophagus once swallowed. (National Geographic, 2012)

1.3 Stomach
The stomach is a large muscle that acts as a temporary storing containing whilst mixing and liquefying the food. It has the ability to hold large meals...
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