Describe How Two Businesses Are Organised

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Describe how two businesses are organised (P3)

I am going to talk about two organisations and how they operate. The organisations I am going to talk about are McDonalds and Chester Zoo.

McDonalds is a fast food restaurant and its purpose is to provide the best and fastest customer service so in this way it will give the organisation a good reputation and help them to make more profit. [pic]

This shows how stuff work in McDonalds. If there would be a problem with customers for example, then the assistant manager would take care of this but if there would be something more serious then the business manager will have to take care of it because he is the top head of managing. This also shows how the organisation is organized and how everyone is on the top of the chart and also at the bottom.

Chester Zoo is a zoo organisation with loads of attractions for children. Its purpose is to keep their customers happy and also help others because Chester Zoo is also a charity and most of its profit goes to charity to help other people.

This is one of the organisation charts for Chester Zoo. This organisation chart shows how the herpetology team work at Chester Zoo. For example the herpetology team manager is on top and everyone below report to him. For example if there was a problem with something to do with the herpetology keepers then they would report it to the herpetology lead keeper who would then report it to the herpetology team manager.

Types of organisational structures
 
There are four types of organisational structures which are: • Functional
• Geographic
• Product
• Type of customer
 
Functional - Functional structures arrange departments according to what goes on within each department. An example of this structure would be Sandwell College where the lecturers are in their own departments, the receptionists and secretaries would be in the administration department or office and the library and IT staff would be in support services.  

Geographic - Geographic structures are mostly about the size of the organisation and where it operates. This could be where there are teams of people operating in different locations like in different towns, cities or countries, so it would be very difficult to organise the business simply by its functions.  

By product - By-product organisational structures offer a range of products or services and these can dictate its structure. For example a supermarket could be organised into the following functional areas: • Fruit and veg

• Cooked meats
• Tinned goods
• Clothing
• Frozen goods
 
By type of customer - By type of customer organisational structures have both consumers as customers and also have other businesses as customers. This can be referred to as B2C (business to consumer) and B2B (business to business).   

Hierarchical structure - A hierarchical structure consists of multiple levels. This means that the chain of command would look like a pyramid with a large base of workers who are supervised by the level above them which continues to the top ranking officer such as the CEO or company president.  

Flat structure - A flat structure has few levels of management between the executive level and the front-line employees. The purpose of a flat structure is to empower employees by making them a larger part of the decision making process in a business. It is designed to make employees more productive. It also allows for more rapid change and problem resolution as the communication occurs more easily between the upper managers and baseline employees.  

 
 
 
 
 
Matrix structure - A matrix structure is a type of management system in which workers report to more than just one person, effectively having two or more supervisors at the same time. For example professionals with different types of expertise are brought together to work on a project. They report to a number of managers of...
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