Dental Insurance

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Contents
Introduction
1. Introduce the topic
2. Current scenario of health and oral health in India and world wide 3. Current trends in funding for health and oral health
Basic consideration
1. What is insurance
2. Principles of insurance
3. Financing Health care in India and World wide
4. Financing oral health care in India and world wide
5. Health insurance evolution, trends, current trends
6. Need of insurance
7. Dental insurance around the world
8. Current scenario of dental insurance in india
Review of literature
1. History/evolution of dental insurance
2. Current trends of insurance in various countries
3. Dental insurance in India
4. Payment system for dentist
5. New challenges
Discussion
Summary and conclusion
References

DENTAL INSURANCE
INTRODUCTION:
World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as “a state of physical, mental, social and emotional well being and not merely absence of disease or infirmity.” Oral health is “a state of being free from chronic mouth and facial pain, oral and throat cancer, oral sores, birth defects such as cleft lip and palate, periodontal (gum) disease, tooth decay and tooth loss, and other diseases and disorders that affect the oral cavity. Risk factors for oral diseases include unhealthy diet, tobacco use, harmful alcohol use, and poor oral hygiene.” (WHO) Oral health means more than good teeth; it is integral to general health and essential for well-being. It implies being free of chronic oro-facial pain, oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancer, oral tissue lesions, birth defects such as cleft lip and palate, and other diseases and disorders that affect the oral, dental and craniofacial tissues, collectively known as the craniofacial complex. The interrelationship between oral and general health is proven by evidence. Severe periodontal disease, for example, is associated with diabetes. The strong correlation between several oral diseases and non-communicable chronic diseases is primarily a result of the common risk factors. Many general disease conditions also have oral manifestations that increase the risk of oral disease which, in turn, is a risk factor for a number of general health conditions Dental caries is still a major oral health problem in most industrialized countries, affecting 60-90% of school children and the vast majority of adults. It is also a most prevalent oral disease in several Asian and Latin American countries, while it appears to be less common and less severe in most African countries. According to WHO Global Oral Health Data (2002) severe periodontitis affects 5-15% of the population. Edentulousness varies from 6 -78 % around the world. Tooth loss in adult life may also be attributed to poor periodontal health. Severe periodontitis which may result in tooth loss, is found in 5-20% of most adult population worldwide. Prevalence of Leukoplakia among adults has been reported to range from 1.1% to 3.6%. Erythoplakia apparently occurs less frequently with population prevalence of 1% or less. Prevalence of oral cancer is particularly high among men and it is eighth most common cancer among worldwide. Incidence of oral cancer vary in men from 1 to 10 cases per 100 000 inhabitants in many countries. In India the age – standardized incidence of oral cancer is 12.6 per 100 000 population. Oral lesion strongly associated with infection is pseudo membranous oral candidiasis, oral hairy lukoplakia, HIV gingivitis, periodontitis dry mouth, dental caries. Dental erosion appear to be growing problem in several countries affecting 8 to 13% of adults. The health status of Indians, is still a cause for grave concern, especially that of the rural population. About 75% of health infrastructure, medical man power and other health resources are concentrated in urban areas where 27% of the population live. PREVELANCE IN INDIA:

1. 74% aware of the prevalence of cavities, but 63% are unconcerned...
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