Democracy and the Federalist: a Reconsideration of the Framers Intent

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The structures and protections of the US Constitution have a great deal to do with “the good life”. I believe (parts of) the Constitution was written to protect our wealth and keep the ongoing struggle to become rich a reality for all and is also an essential part of the government during its early stages as well as today. Happiness and safety, (aka, “the good life”) was a large part in the underlying message of The Constitution. The founding fathers had to have a view of the fundamentals of politics and its relationship to the many. My initial thoughts gravitate toward self-preservation, without it we would not be the nation we are today (and in part the way the founding fathers possible wanted the government to be). Within the need for self-preservation essentially came the Constitution as we know it today. It was a means to have security from dangers of “domestic convulsion” as stated by our founding fathers. We can be certain that previous statements regarding how the government should conduct itself, supports the idea of “the good life”. “Justice is the end of the government. It is the end of civil society.” (Fed. # 51). Per Martin, “justice” means “civil rights” and in his terms meant the protection of economic interests. A recurring item pertaining to the object of government is that it refers to “happiness”. These two basic ideas bring together the real notion that The Constitution was built around the ideals of protecting ourselves and keeping the many as happy as possible.

Reference:
Diamond. M. Democracy and The Federalist: A Reconsideration of the Framers Intent
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