Decision-Making Model Analysis: 7-Step Decision-Making Model

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Decision-Making Model Analysis: 7-Step Decision-Making Model

By | November 2006
Page 1 of 5
Decision-Making Model Analysis: 7-Step Decision-Making Process Decision making is defined as "the cognitive process leading to the selection of a course of action among alternatives" (Decision Making, 2006, para. 1). Decisions are made continually throughout our day. For the most part, our decision-making processes are either sub-conscious or made fairly quickly due to the nature of the decision before us. Most of us don't spend much time deciding what to have for lunch, what to wear, or what to watch on television. For other, more complex decisions, we need to spend more time and analyze the elements of the decision and potential consequences. To assist with this, many people employ the use of a decision-making model. Utilizing a model can serve as a guide for the steps to take in working through an issue to reach a conclusion, but the ability to think critically is crucial in executing the guidelines of the model. One such model is the 7-Step Decision-Making Model. The 7-Step Decision-Making Model was developed by Rick Roberts, director of the University of North Florida's career services department (Roberts, 2006). Though originally intended to guide students through the process of choosing their area of study, and eventually their ultimate career path, it can also be applied to other decisions, both related and unrelated to career exploration. The emphasis with this model is that in order to be effective, the individual faced with a decision must be armed with as much information as possible, and that following the steps in the model will allow for the organization and structure to process and identify critical pieces of information. As the name states, the model consists of seven steps that guide the user through the decision making process.

Step One: Identify the Decision to be Made
Evaluate the issue at hand and identify the core decision to be made. This sounds easy, and many times is, but the core decision can sometimes become clouded in the...
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