Cyber Crimes in India

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Amity Law School, AUUP

Project:- Internet & Cyber Crime –Evidence handling & Retention
Subject:- Cyber Law

A PROJECT SUBBMITTED TO THE AMITY LAW SCHOOL IN PARTIAL FULFULMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FORTHE THIRD SEMESTER EXAMINATION. By: Sarvansh Sharma

Course:- BBA.LL.B (Hons.)
Enrollment No:- A3221510009

Under The Supervision Of:
Mrs.Amrita Beura, Asst. Prof. AMITY LAW SCHOOL AUUP,Noida,U.P.
DECLARATION

I Sarvansh Sharma DO HEREBY DECLARE THAT THIS DISSERTATION ENTITLED “Internet & Cyber Crime –Evidence handling & Retention” SUBMITTED BY ME. AND NEITHER BEEN SUBMITTED IN PART OR FULL OR TO ANY OTHER INSTUTION FOR ANY PURPOSE.

DATE:05/02/2013
PLACE:Noida

Sarvansh Sharma
Course:- BBA.LL.B (Hons.)
Enrollment No:- A3221510009

SUPERVISOR CERTIFICATE

THIS IS TO CERTIFICATE THAT Sarvansh Sharma HAS WORKED UNDER MY SUPERVISION FOR THE PREPARATION OF HIS PROJECT REPORT ON Internet & Cyber Crime –Evidence handling & Retention. (AMRITA BEURA) Supervisor

Acknowledgment

First and foremost, to my friends, for working so hard with me on this project and for tirelessly gather data for the difficult topic. I cannot fully express my gratitude to the exceptional faculty at Amity law school, for their generosity, faith, and superb guidance.

Abstract
India owes a lot to the exponential growth of the Information Technology service Industry over the last 15 years. Though India got its first codified Act in the Information Technology Act (“IT Act), in the year 2000, the IT Industry and in fact all businesses with cross-border obligations have been left crying themselves hoarse for more! The Indian Legislature has now passed a mish –mash legislation in December 2008, which clearly demonstrates the appeasement policy adapted to meet the various and in some instances divergent interests of the Industry and the Government. Document retention, especially the retention of electronic data has become a hot topic in the legal industry. In the 21st century business world, companies are creating and storing the electronic document and information at light speed. Electronic documents are not only found on desktops and laptops but also stored on the phones like Blackberry’s etc. But for modern business organizations storing all this business information can be expensive not only because of the cost of physical storage of tapes but also because of the potential liability of keeping sometimes seemingly useless information for too long.

Bibliography
* Stephen Mason, general editor, Electronic Evidence (3rd edn, LexisNexis Butterworths, 2012) covering Australia, Canada, England & Wales, European Union, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa, United States of America * Stephen Mason, general editor, International Electronic Evidence, (British Institute of International and Comparative Law, 2008), covering Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand and Turkey United States of America on discovery and evidence:

* Michael R Arkfeld, Arkfeld on Electronic Discovery and Evidence (3rd edn,...
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