Cults in Nigeria

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  • Topic: Cult, Cults, Mind control
  • Pages : 6 (2130 words )
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  • Published : February 18, 2013
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National Association of Seadogs (NAS) is a Nigerian charitable and humanitarian organisation and is the registered name for the group also known as the PYRATES CONFRATERNITY. The organisation is dedicated to humanitarian and charitable endeavours within Nigeria and whatever society the members find themselves. The Pyrates Creed - The Pyratical aims of fighting all social ills and conformist degradation within and outside our midst stand supreme. These are translated into the creed which is supposed to act as a guide to our acts and thoughts and to the solutions to dilemmas that may face us in making choices in life. There are four compass points whose function is to give us founding principles upon which to direct our lives. •Against Convention

Against Tribalism
For Humanistic Ideals
For Comradeship and Chilvalry
Certain psychological themes which recur in these various historical contexts also arise in the study of cults. Cults can be identified by three characteristics: 1.a charismatic leader who increasingly becomes an object of worship as the general principles that may have originally sustained the group lose their power; 2.a process I call coercive persuasion or thought reform;

3.economic, sexual, and other exploitation of group members by the leader and the ruling coterie. Milieu Control
The first method characteristically used by ideological totalism is milieu control: the control of all communication within a given environment. In such an environment individual autonomy becomes a threat to the group. There is an attempt to manage an individual's inner communication. Milieu control is maintained and expressed by intense group process, continuous psychological pressure, and isolation by geographical distance, unavailability of transportation, or even physical restraint. Often the group creates an increasingly intense sequence of events such as seminars, lectures and encounters which makes leaving extremely difficult, both physically and psychologically. Intense milieu control can contribute to a dramatic change of identity which I call doubling: the formation of a second self which lives side by side with the former one, often for a considerable time. When the milieu control is lifted, elements of the earlier self may be reasserted. Creating a Pawn

A second characteristic of totalistic environments is mystical manipulation or planned spontaneity. This is a systematic process through which the leadership can create in cult members what I call the psychology of the pawn. The process is managed so that it appears to arise spontaneously; to its objects it rarely feels like manipulation. Religious techniques such as fasting, chanting and limited sleep are used. Manipulation may take on a special intense quality in a cult for which a particular chosen' human being is the only source of salvation. The person of the leader may attract members to the cult, but can also be a source of disillusionment. If members of the Unification Church, for example, come to believe that Sun Myung Moon, its founder, is associated with the Korean Central Intelligence Agency, they may lose their faith. Mystical manipulation may also legitimate deception of outsiders, as in the "heavenly deception" of the Unification Church and analogous practices in other cult environments. Anyone who has not seen the light and therefore lives in the realm of evil can be justifiably deceived for a higher purpose. For instance, collectors of funds may be advised to deny their affiliation with a cult that has a dubious public reputation. Purity and Confession

Two other features of totalism are a demand for purity and a cult of confession. The demand for purity is a call for radical separation of good and evil within the environment and within oneself. Purification is a continuing process, often institutionalized in the cult of confession, which enforces conformity through guilt and shame evoked by mutual criticism and self-criticism in small...
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