Critique of "Cinderella and Princess Culture"

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Lauren Parello
ENG-121-51
Critique
Let Me Believe That I’m A Princess
As a contributing writer for the New York Times, Peggy Orenstein stresses in her article, Cinderella and Princess Culture, that the "princess craze" and "girlie-girl" culture is ruining young girls as they feel constantly pressured to be perfect. Orenstein also recognizes the fact that large companies like Disney are responsible for pushing the princess craze.

Peggy Orenstein elaborates on how the classic fairytale of Cinderella does indeed have a negative effect on girls. Orenstein clearly states and debates throughout her article that the "princess craze" is a world-wide phenomenon and is damaging young girls. The damage Orenstein is referring to is depression caused by girls feeling that they must fulfill the princess image, and when they do not, it makes them feel as if they are not good enough the way they are. Orenstein also goes as far to say that women who are "perpetually nice" are more likely to be depressed and less likely to use contraception.

In Orenstein’s article she notes the fact that Disney Executives claim “that the princess is on its way to becoming the largest girls’ franchise on the planet”. These large companies are dispensing the princess products essentially due to the fact that it sells. Andy Mooney, the man responsible for the princess franchise, started with princess costumes, than began to ask himself other questions to increase production. To summarize the questions, he basically asked himself what a princess would want to see around her room; bed sheets, telephones, televisions. Inevitably, Orenstein objected to the idea of this. But after Mooney stated: “I have friends whose son went through the Power Rangers phase who castigated themselves over what they must’ve done wrong. Then they talked to other parents whose kids had gone through it. The boy passes through. The girl passes through. I see girls expanding their imagination through visualizing...
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