Consumer Behavior

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 44
  • Published : February 18, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Effect of Terminologies on Attitudes toward Advertisements and Brands: Consumer Product Knowledge as a Moderator Author(s): Shih-Chieh Chuang, Chia-Ching Tsai, Yin-Hui Cheng and Ya-Chung Sun Reviewed work(s): Source: Journal of Business and Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 4 (Dec., 2009), pp. 485-491 Published by: Springer Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27753928 . Accessed: 19/02/2013 01:24 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

.
JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.

.

Springer is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal of Business and Psychology.

http://www.jstor.org

This content downloaded on Tue, 19 Feb 2013 01:24:16 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

JBus Psychol (2009) 24:485-491
DOI 10.1007/s 10869-009-9122-4

The Effect of Terminologies on Attitudes Toward Advertisements and Brands:
Yin-Hui

Consumer

Product

Knowledge

as a Moderator

Shih-Chieh Chuang Cheng

Chia-Ching Ya-Chung Sun

Tsai

?

Publishedonline: 2 July 2009
Springer Science+Business Media,

LLC

2009

Abstract The purpose of this study is to investigate the Purpose relationship between advertisement terminology and con sumer product knowledge in the attitudes toward adver tisements and brands. De sign/Methodology/Approach One hundred and twenty undergraduates participated in a 2 x 2 (terminologies are used versus terminologies are not used x high consumer product knowledge versus low consumer product knowl edge) between-subjects design. Low consumer product knowledge individuals Findings form significantlymore favorable advertisement attitudes and brand attitudes toward advertisements with terminol ogies than toward advertisements without terminologies, but no differentially favorable advertisement attitudes and brand attitudes are formed for high consumer product knowledge individuals. Implications The interaction effects of message-level variables (such as terminology) and consumer-level and reviewed by former editor, George Neuman.

edge. Understanding the consumer-level variables of target markets before making advertisement decision is very critical. Techniques of data-mining and psychographics benefit advertisement managers to better realize the tar This is one of the pioneering studies to OriginalityNalue examine the relationship between advertisement terminol ogy and consumer product knowledge in the attitudes toward advertisements and brands. Additionally, most of the prior studies on advertisement effects associated with the use of advertisement terminology ignored the influence of consumer product knowledge. The present study helps us to understand the influence of consumer product geted consumers.

(such as consumer product knowledge) are of importance. The effectiveness of advertisement terminol ogies depends on the levels of consumer product knowl variables

knowledge in advertisement effects and provides evidence for the relationship between advertisement terminology and consumer product knowledge in the attitudes toward advertisements and brands.

Received

S.-C. Chuang Department of Business Administration, National 168, University University, e-mail: bmascc@ccu.edu.tw; C.-C. Taiwan Y.-H. Cheng Tsai Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin, Rd., Min-Hsiung, Chung Cheng Chia-Yi, Taiwan

Keywords Terminology Consumer product knowledge Attitudes toward advertisements Attitudes toward brands

chuang.teacher@msa.hinet.net

Introduction Terminologies refer to the advertising messages that are...
tracking img