Comparison of Eve and Pandora

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CLASSICS 101: GREEK MYTHOLOGY

Spring 2013, CSULB J. Mark Sugars, Ph.D.
Sec. 06 Course #1364 TuTh 1230-1345 My office: MHB - 611 DESN – 112 j.marksugars@csulb.edu Mailbox (Dept. of Comp. World Lit. & Classics): MHB-517

Course Objectives: Greek myths have inspired and influenced literature, music, and the rest of the arts, especially in the West, for three millennia. They have been for people all over the world a source of ideas and allusions. Our goal in “Introduction to Greek Mythology” is to acquire a solid background in the myths of the ancient Greek world, and to become acquainted with the gods, goddesses, monsters, heroes and others who figure in those myths. This knowledge will help you to better understand and appreciate a significant part of the world’s cultural heritage. We shall examine and critique some of the ways people have tried to determine the origins of myths and to interpret their meaning; we shall also explore what we can learn from Greek myths about the values, attitudes, and practices both of the ancients who first told them, and of the moderns who have retold them over the years (and retell them still).

Texts: Trzaskoma et al., Anthology of Classical Myth (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2004); Sophocles, Antigone and Oedipus the King (Oxford: OUP); possibly, other texts available on-line.

My office hours: MW 1230-1330, Tu 1730-1830.

Here is the schedule (subject to future revision) of reading assignments (from Anthology of Classical Myth, unless noted). Do not expect there to always be a close relationship between what we are discussing in class and the readings for that week; the idea is that you will read about something first, and then we will talk about it later in the semester. Be sure to read the Introduction, and pay particular attention to pp. xxi-xxii, which explains the layout of the book, and enables you to make sense of this reading schedule:

Week 1, January 22 - 24: Introduction xvi-xxiii; Diodorus of Sicily 3.56; Homeric Hymns 30, 31 and 32; Hesiod, Theogony; Hyginus 142, 143, 144, 151 and 152; Lucretius 2.589 – 2.660; Apollodorus A1 and A2; Hellanicus 88; Antoninus Liberalis 28; Apollodorus D1 and D2; Eratosthenes 9; Aeschylus 161; Babrius 70; Eratosthenes 27 and 28; Diodorus of Sicily 5.66 – 5.73

Week 2, January 29 - 31: Acusilaus 23; Hesiod, excerpt from Works and Days; Palaephatus 34; Plato, Symposium 189d – 193b; Apollodorus E1; Aeschylus 193; Herodorus 30; Lucian, Dialogues of the Gods 5; Critias, excerpt from Sisyphus; Plato, Protagoras 320c – 322d; Hyginus 153; Apollodorus E2 and E3; Conon 27; Hellanicus 125; Semonides 7; Sophocles 583; Euripides 660; Diodorus of Sicily 2.45 – 2.46; Palaephatus Prologue and 32; Pausanias I and J; Lucretius 5.1161 – 5.1240; Plato, Republic 2.376d – 2.380c; Sallustius 3 and 4; Lucian, On Sacrifices; Aelian 8.3; Theophrastus 16

Week 3, February 5 - 7: Hyginus 139; Homeric Hymns 25; Pausanias F; Herodorus 34; Cleanthes, Hymn to Zeus; Antonius Liberalis 36; Apollodorus B1 and B4; Apollodorus H; Lucian, Dialogues of the Sea Gods 11; Hyginus 138, 145, 149, 150, 155, 176 and 177; Palaephatus 42; Archilochus 122 and 177; Babrius 68; Aeschylus 70; Pausanias D and M; Cornutus 2 and 3; Homeric Hymns 12

Week 4, February 12 -14: Pausanias K; Apollodorus C; Hyginus 146 and 147; Homeric Hymns 13 and 2; Callimachus 6; Eratosthenes 21; Antoninus Liberalis 34; Homeric Hymns 24 and 29; Heraclitus 56; Pausanias H; Homeric Hymns 22; Hyginus186, 187 and 188; Homeric Hymns 8; Hyginus 148; Homeric Hymns 20; Fulgentius 2.11; Lucretius 1.1 – 1.101; Hyginus 197; Sappho 1; Sophocles 941; Antoninus Liberalis 34; Hyginus 58; Bion, Lament for Adonis; Heraclitus 69; Homeric Hymns 6, 10 and 5; Hyginus 94

Week 5, February 19 - 21: Homeric Hymns 9 and 27; Hyginus 180 and 181; Palaephatus 6; Pausanias...
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