Compare How a Relationship Is Presented in “the Manhunt”by Armitage and “Nettles” by Scannell

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Compare how a relationship is presented in “The Manhunt”by Armitage and “Nettles” by Scannell The poem “Nettles” is about a father that cares for his three-year old son after he has fallen in a parade of nettles. Even though the father is most sympathetic towards his son, and cares for him until his pain is “not so raw”, he is furious with anger at the nettles for causing his son the amount of pain that he is feeling at that point. This is understandable as he is his father and he wants to always be there for him, to make sure he is okay which is acceptable at such a young age; however the father will have to understand that he will have to let his son eventually “stand on his own two feet”. The poem “The Manhunt” is showing the relationship between a wife and her husband. It shows that the wife is very desperate for her husband to open up to her, to be truthful about his pain and scars to her. The husband was in the war and shows that the damage that war does continues for a long time after war has finished. The wife fears for her husband because she loves him so much and she fears for his pain and most definitely his fragile condition. He’s returned so fragile from the war, with terrible scarring, both mental and physical. He was shot and the bullet ricocheted through his body and came to a stop in his chest, this has obviously caused him so much pain. The impact of war has affected him so greatly that there is “a sweating unexploded mine, buried in his mind…” which is an imagery of war. The wife realises this eventually, yet the language shows a gradual build up of the relationship with the wife and husband, and recovery from the war, so their relationship will be as close as it was before he was called to war. The language used throughout the poem “Nettles” consists of military language, and a fair few metaphors, used to describe the pain and imagery for the nettles. “Bed seemed a curious name for those green spears,” the term “green spears” is a metaphor...
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