Colored Girls

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For Colored Girls who have Considered Suicide when the Rainbow is Enuf by Ntozake Shange
Table of Contents
for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf Study Guide consists of approx. 53 pages of summaries and analysis on for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf by Ntozake Shange. Browse the literature study guide below:   Introduction

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  Author Biography
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  Plot Summary
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  Chapter Summaries & Analysis
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      Poem One
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      Sequence One
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      Sequence Two
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      Sequence Three
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      Sequence Four
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      Sequence Five
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      Finale
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  Characters
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  Themes
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  Style
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  Historical Context
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  Critical Overview
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  Criticism
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      Critical Essay #1
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      Critical Essay #2
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      Critical Essay #3
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  Media Adaptations
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  Topics for Further Study
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  Compare & Contrast
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  What Do I Read Next?
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  Further Reading
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  Sources
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  Copyright Information
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  How to Cite for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf Study Guide Introduction
for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf is a choreopoem, a poem (really a series of 20 separate poems) choreographed to music. Although a printed text cannot convey the full impact of a performance of for colored girls..., Shange's stage directions provide a sense of the interrelationships among the performers and of their gestures and dance movements. The play begins and ends with the lady in brown. The other six performers represent the colors of the rainbow: the ladies in red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. The various repercussions of "bein alive & bein a woman & bein colored is a metaphysical dilemma" are explored through the words, gestures, dance, and music of the seven ladies, who improvise as they shift in and out of different roles. In the 1970s, when Ntozake Shange herself performed in for colored girls..., she continually revised and refined the poems and the movements in her search to express a female black identity. Improvisation is central to her celebration of the uniqueness of the black female body and language, and it participates in the play's theme of movement as a means to combat the stasis of the subjugation. In studying this play in its textual, static format one should, therefore, keep in mind the improvisational character of actual performance and realize that stasis is the opposite of what Shange wanted for this play. In fact, in her preface she announces to readers that while they listen, she herself is already "on the other side of the rainbow" with "other work to do." She has moved on, as she expects her readers to do as well. This complete Introduction contains 275 words. This study guide contains 15,941 words (approx. 53 pages at 300 words per page). Author Biography

Born Paulette Williams on October 18,1948, Shange, at the age of twenty-three, adopted the Zulu name Ntozake (pronounced "en-toe-zak-ee" and meaning "she who comes with her own things") Shange (pronounced "shon-gay" and meaning "who walks like a lion") as a name more appropriate to her poetic talents. She felt that her Anglo-Saxon last name was associated with slavery and her given name was a feminized version of the male name Paul. Shange once stated in an interview that she changed her name to disassociate herself from the history of a culture that championed slavery. Shange grew up in an affluent family and read voraciously in English, French, and Spanish (the latter with the aid of dictionaries). She also associated with jazz greats Josephine Baker, Chuck Berry, Miles Davis, Dizzie Gillespie, and Charlie Parker, who were friends of her parents. She led a privileged existence, but she felt overprotected and not an active part of the Civil Rights movement taking place around her,...
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