Cold Cases

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 167
  • Published : November 9, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
When the term cold case comes to mind what do you think of? Cold case describes a crime or accident that hasn’t yet been solved to the fullest. A cold case is considered unsolved until a suspect has been identified, trialed, and charged. It is also not the subject of a recent criminal investigation, but it may be possible that new information could emerge from new witness testimony, re-examined suspects or witnesses gather new material evidence, as well as recent actives of the suspects. New techniques that are developed after the case can be used with the still standing evidence to re-analyze the causes. This often results in no new results. Most timed cold cases are brutal or other major felony crimes. Such crimes consist of murder or rape. In some instances disappearances of victims can result in a case being considered a cold case. Meaning the victim hasn’t been seen or heard from for some time. About 35 percent of these cases are not even cold cases at all. Some become instantly cold when a solved case is re-opened due to the findings of new evidence pushes officials away from the original suspects. This happens more than you think and one could say justice was miscarried. Other cases go cold when human remains are discovered well after the fact. In other cases they are classified cold cases when a case that was thought to be an accident or suicide is found to be a murder when new evidence is found. Regardless of what may have happen to result in a case going cold something has to be done about the tragedy. Unsolved crimes are on the rise. The bulk of manslaughter at the moment result in being unsolved at plenty of big-city police departments. This fact has been proven by the Scripps Howard News Service. This news service conducted a study of crime records provided by the FBI. The proportion of homicides that result in being unsolved in the United States has swept upward severely. Every year in America approximately 6,000 killers get away scot-free with murder. Roundly 185,000 murders went unsolved from 1980 to 2008. “This is very frightening”, stated Bill Hagmaier, executive director of the International Homicide Investigators Association and retired chief of the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of the Violent Crime. At the same time some progress has been made. In 2008, police solved 35 percent of homicides in Chicago, 22 percent in New Orleans and 21 percent in Detroit. Likewise authories solved 75 percent of the killings in Philadelphia, 92 percent in Denver and 94 percent in San Diego. (Thomas Hargrove, 2010) For the safety of our law abiding citizens even more progress needs to be made. Some may think why is this? Even though advancentments in DNA analysis and forensic science has been made, police officials fall short and fail to make arrest in more than one-third of all murders. National clearance rates for these types of crimes have fallen from approximately 90 percent in the 1960’s to below 65 percent in more recent times. Experts state that homicides are more difficult to figure out now more than ever because crimes of passion, where assailants are easier to identify have been replaced by drug- and gang- related killings. A lot of police chiefs particularly in areas with rising numbers of unsolved crimes blame it on a lack of witness cooperation. Regardless this is a very serious problem and the public is starting to take notice. (Thomas Hargrove, 2010) For some people when the term cold case comes to mind its hit to close to or exactly at home. On the dawn of June 27, 2000 Magi Bish was in route with her precious daughter Molly Bish. This morning seemed to be going as any other day were to go. Magi was dropping her daughter off to work at Comins Pond. This was the local swimming hole. Molly had just started her new summer job there as a lifeguard. It was just before 10 a.m. The par5king lot was empty except for a dumping truck dropping off sand. Magi stated, “what she said to me is, ‘I love you,...
tracking img