Codes and Convention

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Codes and conventions:
In the short story what’s a Bum Mom, Kathleen Rockwell uses several convincing techniques to carry out the guiding question on civility. One accurate is metaphors, in the short story the author Kathleen Rockwell describes the scene in the story were they see a homeless women out the bus window. “She stopped at a wastebasket and retrieved a large discarded sketch book. She flipped through it until she found a blank page. Standing on the corner of sixth and 14th, she reached into one of her bags and found a marker. She made on a deft stroke, and then another, on the page another artist left her. My bus moved on. This can be carried out as a metaphor for society and how we view moreover treat homelessness people. Nevertheless we don’t acknowledge it, as a result of ignorance. We are use to pressing on as well as assume we never saw them or they didn’t exist. Hence moving on with our uncivil behavior. Kathleen Rockwell sees a person that has something with I them. A talented women however she is homeless so society will ignore her and continue on with there daily lives. Another technique is she uses first person to relate with the short story. She asks questions moreover show that their scared, a feeling that many people have. They had to do it, anyone would have done it, but did they cry while they were doing it?”

The photo essay state street family by Glenn H. Austin analyze the argument of homelessness and how society looks down on, preferentially ignores the reality of living on the streets. These pictures show how everyone has approximately the same feelings; therefore society doesn’t show the same character to the homeless. The couple in the photo their attitude shows carelessness as is seen no eye-contact with each other, and perhaps the desire to avoid any connection to homelessness. Another example is the first picture a homeless man holds a sign reading, “Talk to me”, how the homeless, like anybody else,...
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