Clothes at School

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1344
  • Published : April 7, 2005
Open Document
Text Preview
In a 1969 Supreme Court case, Tinker vs. Des Moines, a controversy was started over students wearing black armbands to protest American involvement in the Vietnam War. From this case, and many others like it multiple school boards believe that with uniforms or stricter dress codes, the students will have better learning environments. Many schools now implement strict dress code standards, or school uniforms, because of the cases. Moreover, the students believe they already are not being allowed to express themselves and strict school dress codes and uniforms would not allow the students to do so. One of the things I believe a big deal in schools are uniforms. I personally am against uniforms at school. A reason as to why I feel this way is because they don't allow people to be different, or express themselves. With uniforms a person is dull and exactly the same as the next. While it may be true that certain elements like hair color and gender make them different, it's supposed to be more than just that; clothes and not uniforms are suppose to help a student be this unique person. In the US, students have a right to a free and public education. With out depending on whether the student chooses to wear a uniform or not. Have you ever noticed the person way in the back of class that's wearing expensive clothes, and ponder is he/she like the persona of the clothes he/she's wearing outside of school? Well I have, and stereotyping really comes out best in what a person wears. You might not think it's true but it is. Hell even I stereotype or am stereotyped. Because of a person wearing expensive clothes they're perceived as the ‘jock' or the ‘prep'. A person wearing black clothes is usually perceived as a gothic. Or a person wearing cowboy boots is seen as the ‘hick' or so-called cowboy. When in reality they maybe just like you, the normal average Joe. But because we live in a world that loves to stereotype everybody and everything that's different, we...
tracking img