China: the World's Next Superpower

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  • Topic: People's Republic of China, Superpower, Great power
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Why China Is The Next Superpower Clayton Kimberley Sam Mahboob March 13thh, 2013

Kimberley 1 China's importance in the world is profound, and steadily growing. Its position as a world power is well asserted, and already has many trademarks of a superpower. China's position as a future superpower is an important topic to examine due to China's vital position in the global economy, and is a worthy contender for economic relations and military alliances of other world powers, and it is a nation from which other countries can learn a great deal. There are many great powers in the world, but “superpower” is a title typically reserved for the United States. The term “superpower” can be attributed to a country that holds great influence in the world and has the power to protect and assert this influence.1 therefore, in this regard, China can be considered a superpower as a result of its booming economy and vast military. The main factor that arouses controversy about whether or not China is a superpower is its political system. Despite China's lack of a contemporary western style democracy, it is very powerful politically and despite the issues with human rights, the government is able to successfully control the people with a high approval rating. Additionally, being a member of the United Nations Security Council, it has international influence. Through its economic influence, military force, and politics, China will be the world's next superpower. The most prominently known attribute of China's presence as an emerging superpower is its economy. China currently has the second largest Gross Domestic Product in the world. 2

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being second to the United States, China's economic growth rate is unprecedented, and has already soared past Japan's in 2010.3 Following Mao Zedong's 10 year Cultural Revolution, China was left in famine and poverty. After Mao's death in 1976, China would see a new, more practical leader who would modernize China and pave the way for the country's economic explosion. Deng Xiaoping 1 2 3 Dictionary.com, "superpower." Last modified 2010. Accessed March 12, 2013. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/superpower. World Bank, "China's GDP." Last modified 2013. Accessed March 12, 2013. http://search.worldbank.org/all?qterm=china gdp. Bloomberg , "China Overtakes Japan as World's Second-Biggest Economy." Last modified 2010. Accessed March 12, 2013. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-08-16/chinaeconomy-passes-japan-s-in-second-quarter-capping-three-decade-rise.html.

Kimberley 2 replaced Mao in 1978. He was a more pragmatic communist politician who looked to open up China to the rest of the world and develop international relations. He introduced many revolutionary reforms to the Chinese political system which allowed for great economic success. He developed Four Modernizations which he believed were necessary for China to undertake: agriculture, industry, defence, and scientific knowledge.4 This plan served as a basic outline for China's path to success. Deng understood the importance of a change in political philosophy, and knew the importance of converging capitalist ideals. While a supporter of communism, Deng believed that ideals should not have to be derived directly from socialist ideals. He developed the philosophy known as “seeking truths from facts”5. Deng once stated “It doesn't matter whether a cat is white or black, as long as it catches mice.”6, meaning that if a policy is works, it does not matter if it is socialist or capitalist. This philosophy allowed Deng to develop the Socialist Market Economy, which is the economic model still used by China today. Deng introduced a reform that no longer allowed government redistribution of wealth outside of taxation. The independence enjoyed by industries allowed them to be more profitable and led industrial revolution in China. Deng sought to end Mao's policy of self-reliance, as Mao's attempt to modernize China during the “Great Leap...
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