Children with Reading Problem

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The article by Susan M. Tancock focuses its attention to the needs of special students. These students are considered poor readers. They are usually behind in reading and writing skills when compared to their classmates (peers). The special instruction that these students receive ordinarily involves the recognition of identifying sounds of letters and words instead of the construction of their meaning within the context of the text or story. In the article we are told the poor readers are usually asked to read aloud more often than other more skilled readers. Also, their teachers interrupt their reading instead of encouraging them towards a self monitoring approach to their reading. Tancock stresses the importance of being sensitive to certain ideals when tutoring young children who have reading difficulties. First of all, she feels it is of utmost importance that the tutor should truly believe that their tutee can and will become a good reader and writer. Secondly, she states that the tutee needs predictable material to help encourage successful reading habits. To accomplish this task it is best if the tutor uses quality children=s books written by well-known authors. Children can be encouraged to Aread like a writer@ by using themes that are built around the child=s personal interests. This will provide the student with a more in depth involvement with the reading process. Tutors must build lessons around the child=s strengths to build confidence within the child for future reading tasks. The students also need to be encouraged to make predictions in their reading to help develop them into risk takers. In the lesson with Gayla and Chase the author described how Gayla first sets out familiar reading material (books) for Chase to choose from so that he could read aloud. Because Chase is already familiar with these books and has probably read them in the past, it will enable him to be become confident in guessing when it comes to something difficult for him to...
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