Chicago Turabian Styles

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University of California Berkeley Library

Turabian and Chicago Styles Citations
This guide provides examples and the basic guidelines for citing sources following the University of Chicago Press's Chicago Manual of Style and Kate L. Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, commonly referred to as Chicago Style or Turabian Style. Kate Turabian, the dissertation secretary at the University of Chicago for over 30 years, developed her guide for students and researchers writing papers, theses, and dissertations. Her manual is based on the University of Chicago Press's Manual of Style and departs from it in few places. "Turabian," as her guide is called, synthesizes the rules most important for students' papers and other scholarly research not intended for publication, and omits some of the publishing details and options that "Chicago" provides. For webbased and electronic resources, this guide followed examples and rules from Chicago Style, because Turabian has not been revised recently enough to include this information.

Choose Between Two Citation Systems
Both Chicago and Turabian styles allow you to choose between two systems of providing references: 1. Notes and bibliography: numbered footnotes or endnotes in your text, with Bibliography or Works Cited list at the end of the paper, listing alphabetically the sources in your notes.

2. In-text author-date citations and reference list: in your text, brief parenthetical references consisting of the author's last name, publication year, and page(s) referred to, with an alphabetized Reference List at the end of your paper providing complete entries for works cited in parenthetical references.

Ask you instructor which he or she prefers you to use. The principle differences between the systems are the placement of references in the text, the placement of dates in your references, and capitalization of titles. Whichever system you choose, be consistent in applying it throughout the paper.

Notes and Bibliography Citation System
Note numbers are superscript in Turabian style, but regular numbers followed by a period and space are preferred in Chicago. See first example below. In all other examples we will use Turabian superscript style.

BOOKS
Footnote or Endnote Reference

Corresponding Bibliography Entry

Single author:
Turabian superscript note numbers:
1

Mariah Burton Nelson, The Stronger Women
Get, the More Men Love Football: Sexism and the
American Culture of Sports (New York: Harcourt
Brace, 1994), 54.

Nelson, Mariah Burton. The Stronger Women Get,
the More Men Love Football: Sexism and the
American Culture of Sports. New York:
Harcourt Brace, 1994.

Chicago note numbers:

1. Mariah Burton Nelson, The Stronger Women
Get, the More Men Love Football: Sexism and the
American Culture of Sports (New York: Harcourt
Brace, 1994), 54.
Single author of translated work:
2

Louis Verneuil, The Fabulous Life of Sarah
Bernhardt, trans. Ernest Boyd (Westport, CT:
Greenwood Press, 1972), 72-73.

Verneuil, Louis. The Fabulous Life of Sarah
Bernhardt. Translated by Ernest Boyd.
Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1972.

Two to three authors:
3

Ruhi Saith and Barbara Harriss-White, Gender
Sensitivity of Well-being Indicators (Geneva:
United Nations Research Institute for Social
Development, 1998), 199-200.

Saith, Ruhi and Barbara Harriss-White. Gender
Sensitivity of Well-being Indicators.
Geneva: United Nations Research Institute
for Social Development, 1998.

More than three authors or editors; editor(s) in lieu of author(s): 4

Barbara Fawcett and others, eds. Practice
and Research in Social Work: Postmodern Feminist
Perspectives, (London: Routledge, 2000), 65-66.

Fawcett, Barbara and others, eds. Practice and
Research in Social Work: Postmodern Feminist
Perspectives. London: Routledge, 2000.

Corporate author within a larger organization; compilers' names also provided: 6
College...
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