Checkpoint: Computer Comparison

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Computer Comparison

When most people think of computers, they do not visualize the components inside that make up the computer system. Most state-of-the-art systems have the same components as a personal computer to meet the user’s needs. Although state-of-the-art computers offer more memory and storage capabilities, my personal computer offers some of the same components but is less expensive. I purchased my Toshiba Satellite Notebook for school, therefore it is rather new. My Toshiba notebook allows me to work in different locations. I purchased my notebook for the durable design, performance, long battery life, and it was on sale. My computer has an Intel Pentium Dual CPU T3400 Processor that operates at a speed of 2.16GHz. I can access up to 2.00GB of random access memory and 140GB of hard disk space. My computer has the following input and output devices: keyboard, mouse, screen, monitor, printer, and speakers. My pc has the following storage devices available: universal serial bus (USB), SD card slot, hard drive, and a DVD-RW drive. As an online student, the lack of mass storage and how my computer looks is not important to me. I want to have a computer that offers the essential components and allows me the opportunity to obtain an education. A new state-of-the-art system can also allow a user the same portability as a personal computer, but with a higher price tag. A new state-of-the-art computer system has Intel Core Duo P8400 Processor that operates at a speed of 2260 MHZ or more. State-of-the-art computers have massive amounts of storage for videos, photos, and music. Many of the new systems come in a variety of unique colors and textures to appeal to today’s consumers. Most of the larger systems are fast performers but lack in power and battery life. "The 8.2 pound VGN-AW230J/H may not be a powerful performer, but it eats like one, draining its battery in just 1 hour, 49 minutes in our tests” (Marrin, 2009, para. 3)....
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