Page 1 of 4

Causes of Macbeths Downfall

Continues for 3 more pages »
Read full document

Causes of Macbeths Downfall

  • School: St Marouns College
Page 1 of 4
Causes of Macbeths Downfall – Essay
By Jordan Koorey
Shakespeare’s Macbeth, based on a play written in 1605 explores the life journey of Macbeth as he climbs the ladder of the social hierarchy. Determined to become King, Macbeth will kill any and all that get in his way. Driven by ambition, Macbeth puts his faith in the words and prophecies of three witches after a prediction that Macbeth would gain the new title of Thane of Cawdor. Alongside with ambition, Lady Macbeth, is a key instrument to Macbeths’ ambition to become king, continuously pressuring him, when he fears he has gone too in his schemes for greatness. We can definitely see a well – regarded and loyal soldier of the Scottish army change to a murderous tyrant. His downfall is complete and he is responsible for his fate. It is his ambition, the influence of his wife, Lady Macbeth and the prophesies of the three witches and then his misplaced confidence in his invulnerability that causes his decline. These all contribute to the primary reasons for Macbeths moral downfall as he climbs the ladder of success. The term ‘moral downfall’ refers to the emotional and social impact as oppose to a physical downfall, which is described as a step back in society, including the loss of money, fortune, family, social life and wellbeing. By succumbing to committing evil acts to achieve his ambition, he basically destroys Macbeths morality, leading to his downfall. Macbeths Ambition

In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, ambition is the main theme that the protagonist, Macbeth, possesses. To be ambitious is basically an eager or strong desire to achieve something, such as fame or power. In Macbeth, ambition is a main theme. Macbeth, the protagonist and tragic hero in William Shakespeare's Macbeth, possesses hamartia. Hamartia, named by Aristotle in Poetics, is a tragic flaw possessed by any tragic hero. Over the course of the play, Macbeth's ambition grows. He succeeds in murdering Duncan, being named the new king, and ruling...
Causes of Macbeths Downfall – Essay
By Jordan Koorey
Shakespeare’s Macbeth, based on a play written in 1605 explores the life
journey of Macbeth as he climbs the ladder of the social hierarchy.
Determined to become King, Macbeth will kill any and all that get in his
way. Driven by ambition, Macbeth puts his faith in the words and
prophecies of three witches after a prediction that Macbeth would gain the
new title of Thane of Cawdor. Alongside with ambition, Lady Macbeth, is a
key instrument to Macbeths’ ambition to become king, continuously
pressuring him, when he fears he has gone too in his schemes for
greatness. We can definitely see a well regarded and loyal soldier of the
Scottish army change to a murderous tyrant. His downfall is complete and
he is responsible for his fate. It is his ambition, the influence of his wife,
Lady Macbeth and the prophesies of the three witches and then his
misplaced confidence in his invulnerability that causes his decline. These
all contribute to the primary reasons for Macbeths moral downfall as he
climbs the ladder of success. The term ‘moral downfall’ refers to the
emotional and social impact as oppose to a physical downfall, which is
described as a step back in society, including the loss of money, fortune,
family, social life and wellbeing. By succumbing to committing evil acts to
achieve his ambition, he basically destroys Macbeths morality, leading to
his downfall.
Macbeths Ambition
In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, ambition is the main theme that the
protagonist, Macbeth, possesses. To be ambitious is basically an eager or
strong desire to achieve something, such as fame or power. In Macbeth,
ambition is a main theme. Macbeth, the protagonist and tragic hero in
William Shakespeare's Macbeth, possesses hamartia. Hamartia, named by
Aristotle in Poetics, is a tragic flaw possessed by any tragic hero. Over the
course of the play, Macbeth's ambition grows. He succeeds in murdering
Duncan, being named the new king, and ruling the kingdom. As his
success grows, so does his ambitious nature. Fearing that the rest of the
witches' prophecy will come true (that Banquo's sons will be kings),
Macbeth decides to murder both him and his son (namely Fleance). Still
feeling threatened, Macbeth murders Macduff's family (to send a message
of his power to Macduff). It is evident in the play that this theme exists.
We can definitely see that Macbeth uses his ambition to justify bad and
evil actions, whereas most will use it for good. Not only it is seen
throughout the course of the play, he’s ambition is revealed by Macbeth in
Act 1, Scene 7. As mentioned in lines 25-27, Macbeth says: I have no spur
to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps
itself and falls on th' other. Macbeth, trying to rationalise his impending