Canada-India Relation

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Canada-India Relations
* Fact Sheet: HTML Version | PDF Version * (129 KB)
In India, Canada is represented by the High Commission of Canada in New Delhi. Canada also has two consulate generals in Chandigarh and Mumbai, a consulate in Chennai and trade offices in Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Hyderabad, and Kolkata. India is represented in Canada by a High Commission in Ottawa, and by consulates in Toronto and Vancouver. Canada and India have longstanding bilateral relations, built upon shared traditions of democracy, pluralism and strong interpersonal connections with an Indian diaspora of more than one million in Canada.  This expanding bilateral relationship is supported by a wide range of agreements and by PM Singh and PM Harper’s commitment to increase annual bilateral trade to $15 billion by 2015. Canada’s priorities in India include infrastructure, energy, food, education, science and technology. India is an important source country for immigration to Canada. Prime Minister Harper undertook a state visit to India from November 4-9, his longest official foreign visit since assuming office in 2006. During the visit the following agreements were signed: the Canada-India Social Security Agreement, the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on cooperation in Information and Communication Technologies and Electronics, and the MOU between York University and the Indian Defence Research and Development Organization. Announcements were also made on: agreement on the Appropriate (Administrative) Arrangements of the Nuclear Cooperation Agreement; institutionalization of annual Strategic Dialogues between respective Foreign, Trade, and Energy Ministers, and between the offices of National Security Advisors; upgrading of the trade office in Bangalore to a Consulate; announcement of updates to the air transport agreement; and announcement of the winners of the competition for the Canada-India Research Centre of Excellence. Trade and Investment

According to Statistics Canada, bilateral merchandise trade between Canada and India in 2011 totalled approximately CAD$ 5.2 billion, an increase of 23.4% percent 2010. While Canadian merchandise exports to India in 2011 totalled $2.6 billion (a 27.7% percent increase 2010), imports from India reached $2.5 billion (a 19.3% percent increase from 2010). Top Canadian exports to India include vegetables (mostly peas and lentils), fertilisers, paper and paperboard, machinery, wood pulp, precious stones, and iron and steel. Canadian imports from India include organic chemicals, precious stones and metals, knit apparel, woven apparel, machinery, and iron and steel. Canada - India Bilateral Trade 2005 – 2011                                     [Figures in billion Canadian Dollars]

 | 2005| 2006| 2007| 2008| 2009| 2010| 2011|
Canada’s Imports 
from India| 1.79| 1.92| 1.98| 2.2| 2.0| 2.12| 2.5|
Canada’s Exports 
to India| 1.09| 1.68| 1.79| 2.42| 2.14| 2.15| 2.6|
Total| 2.87| 3.59| 3.77| 4.62| 4.14| 4.27| 5.1|
[Source: Statistics Canada]
Canada – India Bilateral Direct Investment
In 2011, the stock of two-way direct investment between Canada and India was C$5 billion. [Figures in million Canadian Dollars]
 | 2005| 2006| 2007| 2008| 2009| 2010| 2011|
Canadian Direct 
Investment in India| 319| 677| 506| 667| 520| 676| 587| Indian Direct 
Investment in Canada| 171| 211| 1,988| 6,514| 6,217| 4,364| 4,386| Total| 490| 888| 2,494| 7,181| 6,737| 5,040| 4,983| [Source: Statistics Canada]
Science and Technology
In 2005, Canada and India signed an Agreement for Scientific and Technological Cooperation to foster greater bilateral S&T collaboration. The agreement was officially ratified in 2008 and is supported by the Canada-India Joint Science and Technology Cooperation Committee. During the November 2012 State Visit to India, the Prime Ministers of Canada and India tasked the Joint S&T Committee with developing an Action Plan...
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