Busy Trap

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Tim Kreider's 'The Busy Trap,' is an expository essay in which Kreider speaks out about the world's endless obsession with unnecessary or daunting tasks. The article manages to paint a picture of what society views as 'busy' along with the negative impact has on one's mental health. Kreider states that society sees being busy as a means of seeming accomplished and productive. In today's society, being bogged down and having virtually no free time is deemed "good." It’s the rest of the world who are deemed "unimportant" in comparison to these overdriven, anxious individuals. Kreider not only targets adults who have fallen victim to the increase in the busy lifestyle but children as well who have taken on more than their little minds can wrap itself around. Today's children are bombarded with many activities; from soccer practice to classical music lessons. Children are lacking free time. There's nothing for them apart from getting an early start on solidifying a concrete future. But what can be said apart from the fact that this is what society has begun to drill into their little minds. Like Kreider insists, business is greatness. However, in all truths what are children really learning when they are loaded with too many activities that has their minds swirling apart from the very definitions of such words as exhausted, tired and drained? Kreider takes a moment to reflect on his own childhood in which he did nothing more than spend (or to those obsessed with being busy) waste his time doing silly unconstructive things. Things such as making animated films, getting together with friends, surfing the Word Book Encyclopedia - being a child. To Kreider, these things made up the best years of his life. These things moulded him into the person he would forever remain - they provided him with valuable skills. Unlike the people of today who know absolutely nothing more than work, work and more work. Kreider makes sure that his reader gets the idea into his/her head of...
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