Bus 210 Week 6 Checkpoint

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  • Topic: Motivation, Siemens, Expectancy theory
  • Pages : 1 (330 words )
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  • Published : May 16, 2012
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In the first case study I believe we see a lot of the expectancy theory. According to the text (Jones, G. R. 2007) the expectancy theory “argues that work motivation is a function of an employee’s belief (a) that working hard will allow the person to perform at a high level, and (b) that if the person does perform well, he or she will be rewarded for it (see Figure 7.3). According to this view, motivation is therefore a two-stage process. Several factors determine whether or not employees believe that working hard will lead to a superior job performance. Each of these factors is discussed next.”. We see this as Mary Ellen Sheets founded a company and issued out franchises to those who wanted to be an owner within the company. Mary Ellen Sheets implemented motivation to new franchisee’s by building her own training facility, insuring that new owners were properly prepared from learning how to safely move large things in tricky situations to how to properly send royalties. This achieved the expectancy theory of insuring that those who are operating businesses under her companies name are doing so correctly. In the second case study it’s obviously strongly connected to the goal setting theory. Klaus Kleinfeld was a man that was able to motivate his staff into working long hours and weekends to achieve production to meet demand, and quickly evening the table to compete with competitors of the companies X-Ray equipment. It says in the very beginning of the study (Jones, G.R. 07) “The negotiations were tough. But Kleinfeld won over workers, hanging around the factory asking detailed questions. He answered e-mails from employee reps almost immediately, even late at night, recalls Werner Mönius, chairman of the workers council in Erlangen, Germany, home base of Siemens Medical Solutions Division. “He was able to motivate people to pull together,” says Mönius.” This shows that Klaus was able to set goals as a motivational tactic.
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