Broken Homes

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THE PROBLEM AND ITS SCOPE INTRODUCTION

Rationale
Born and death, that’s the cycle of our existence here on Earth. As we were born, we learn things and develop it for us to survive. Home was our first school, it is where we learn our first walk and of course our first word. Parent is our first teacher, we learn from them how to love and appreciate simple things. And then School came, it is a place where we discover ourselves and develop our skills. Home, parents and school, this are the basic foundation of who we are right now. Our life here on Earth is not just simple living but it is an extraordinary journey and venture what really our life is all about. Some were rich and some were poor, but God love us equally no limits and boundaries. For God so love the word that He gave us His only son for our salvation. As my 20 years of existence here on Earth, I learned a lot of things that molded me of who I am right now. Life is not about looking back and wishing that today is the same with the past. Life is all about moving on, accepting changes and looking forward to what makes you stronger and more complete because it’s never too late to have a life and never too late to change one. I choose broken family as my main social problem in life. Everything starts within your family. It started on how you are, being raised by your parents. They are one who is responsible on how we act things out. I conducted this study in order to awaken us from the reality about Life, and make some possible actions towards it.

Review of Related Studies
The topic of broken homes has been a central part of delinquency theory since the emergence of criminology in the 19th century. Indeed, the “defective” or incomplete family constitutes one of the most common and enduring themes in the modern attempt to explain juvenile delinquency. Consistent with the primacy and persistence of the broken home as a concept in criminological analysis, an extensive research literature involving hundreds of studies has accumulated. This literature is diverse and spread across a number of distinct disciplines constituting separate areas of theory and literature, including sociological criminology (the “traditional” delinquency literature), developmental psychology, pediatric psychiatry, marriage and family sociology, and psychiatric and criminology.

Although the empirical evidence on broken homes and delinquency is large and diverse, it is surprisingly incomplete and disappointingly inconclusive. The dozens of studies yield little accumulation of well-documented knowledge. This lack of knowledge is not for want of effort. A number of notable reviews have cataloged the variety of studies and conclusions, (e.g , Bahr 1979; Demo and Acock 1988; Geismar and Wood 1986.) Yet this review produce few generalizable conclusions that are empirically consistent and concrete, Moreover, specific statements about important variations in these effects across persons, social groups and family contexts are still impressionistic, tentative and approximate. Since the basic aim of science is to develop knowledge cumulatively across many fallible, repeated studies, our concern in this paper is the development of a systematic, quantitative, integrative assessment of existing research on the relation between broken homes and delinquency. The traditional approach of assessing and synthesizing a body of research is the “narrative research review.” This entails a careful subjective summary of prior studies in which the following occurs: a number of studies are identified (either a representative sampling or an exhaustive listing); the features of these studies are described and evaluated. This paper critically reviews the theoretical frameworks currently used to explain the processes through which work and family are linked, i.e., segmentation, compensation, and spillover. In the literature, these processes are treated as competing explanations, even though evidence and logic suggests...
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