British vs. France Rule in Africa

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Within the information presented in this course there have been many similarities and differences noted about the French and British rule in western Africa. Because the authoritative forces were of two completely different countries, each had their own ideas and concerns for the African nations. It is known, the French ruled with a kind of direct force, whereas the British ruled with an indirect notion. Though the two separate countries differed in their strategies, they each had the aspiration for the same outcome: turning the Africans into proper English or French men and women. In 1808 the United States seized to import African slaves. The British changed their policies. They led the abolitionist movement around the world to end the African slave trade and eventually end slavery itself. This began by establishing a bi-lateral court system with other nations called the court of mixed commissions. The British worked to hinder slave ships traveling to the Americas by intersecting them and eventually trying the ship itself as a whole. If the ship was found guilty of illegal slave trade and activity, the Africans aboard the ship were freed and re-educated in British society. The Africans were taught about British culture, religion, and language in Freetown, Sierra Leone. This began in approximately 1820. They were taught the English language, the teachings of the Episcopal Church, and how to be black Englishmen and women. The reason for this education was that if the freed Africans were to return to their home towns following their schooling, they would spread the good word about how the British were no longer active in the slave trade, and how they were trying to help the African nations. By the time of the Berlin Conference in 1884-85, the British started to doubt their own project. The Berlin Conference divided Africa into various parts. This separation did not perfect the relations between the British and the African peoples. Once the British people...
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