Brent Staples' a Brother's Murder

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Brent Staples' A Brother's Murder

A belief I feel very strongly about proposes that all problems faced by our society have solutions. If this belief is true, why do problems still face us today? The answer could be a result of either laziness by the people in our society in finding these solutions or just the fact that there are too many problems to solve. Maybe this belief I have is too far out of reach to be true. On the other hand, Brent Staples, a well-respected writer, seems to share this idea with me. In his works, he displays a great deal of motivation to solve particular problems faced by society. In "A Brother's Murder," he uses a personal account of murder within the streets caused by social placement to illustrate the problem within the lower class. After reading this article, I questioned the stability of our society, and the overall severity of this problem of murder in the streets.

The inner streets of our nations' cities have, over the years, proven to be war zones. Gangs are roaming the streets to protect their territory, making gunplay an everyday task. The smell of fear, death, and misguided souls reek to the nose of the onlooker. Brent Staples does an outstanding job of describing the severity of these problems. His brother, Blake, leads a life molded by this street life. His official cause of death was murder. However, at the young age of twenty-two years old, they should have noted his death as a casualty of war. He played a part in the war of gangs and guns. If he did not live in the inner streets of Roanoke, Va., he would probably be alive today. In most other parts of the country, you can have an argument with one of your best friends and not get killed over it. Blake was shot six time s by a good friend over an argument about a former girlfriend.

Brent Staples grew up in the same type of atmosphere as his little brother Blake. As Staples explains in paragraph four of "A Brother's Murder," he chose a different...
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