Book Review

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Joseph J. Ellis. Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. New York: Vintage Books, 2000.
Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation is a book about the American revolutionary generation, but as Ellis puts it a more modern way so that everyone can understand. This book includes information about our founding fathers and stories that some had no idea about; it also gives you some details about the politics going on during the time period but still indicates specific people in history. Ellis has the time frame of this book from right around when America declares independence right up Hamilton dies.

Joseph J. Ellis is an extremely talented author who has written several incredible books in his time. Some of those books include American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson, Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adam, School for Soldiers: West Point and the Profession of Arms, and finally The New England Mind in Transition. The reason why Ellis is qualified to write such a book like this is because he went to schools like William and Mary plus Yale University. Not only did Ellis attend prestige schools but one of his books won the National Book Award in 1997.

After reading Ellis’s acknowledgments it was clear as to why he wanted to write this book. He wanted to be able to write a book that told everyone about the American revolutionary generation without being like everyone else who’s tried it before. He said that he wanted to write a modest-sized account of a massive historical subject. Although Ellis never formally addresses the attended audience through his acknowledgments it was evident that he wanted anyone who wanted to learn more about the time period and our founding fathers to be able to read his book.

Ellis organizes this book into six different chapters, but each chapter is completely different from the previous ones. After reading the whole book the reader realizes that Ellis had put this information in reverse order....
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