Black People and Aunt Alexandra

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English 10RName ___________________________________
Ms. GlassTKMB- Study Guide Chapters 12 and 13

Directions: Read chapters 12 and 13 and answer the following questions in complete sentences.

1. How does Jem change? Be specific.
a. Page 115-Scout explains that Jem doesn’t want her hanging around him all the time…”stop pestering me.” And Calpurnia begins referring to him as Mister Jem now, a title usually reserved for adults. b. Page 116-“Jem developed a maddening air of wisdom that summer.” Meaning that he is rational now and understands things…not like a little kid anymore. He helps to put things into perspective for Scout that she doesn’t understand. c. Jem is growing up. He is trying to make sense of things he sees, trying to be like Atticus, and trying to put behind him childish games and youthful pranks. Consequently, sometimes he is moody and sometimes occasionally seems to lord his authority over Scout.

2. What are the minor disappointments that start the summer for Scout? What do they foreshadow? a. Page 115-116- READ ALOUD- Atticus got called to an emergency session of legislature, Dill is not coming to visit for the summer, and Aunt Alexandra arrives unannounced to live with them. b. These small disappointments foreshadow the trial of Tom Robinson.

3. What is ironic about Jem and Scout’s visit to Calpurnia’s church? Explain. a. Page 119-120- READ ALOUD TO CLASS- The children experience prejudice against them. They don’t possess prejudice and neither does Calpurnia. They are surprised when church goer Lula confronts Cal asking her how she could bring white kids to the black church. b. However, just as not all the white people are prejudiced, not all the black people are prejudiced. Zeebo and Reverend Skyes are both welcoming to Scout and Jem.

4. Everybody is beginning to tell Scout to act like a lady. How is it ironic that her church and...
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