Black Like Me

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Issues of race and racism have been a central concern for many decades. Racism, in this context can be understood as, the belief that one race is superior or more important than another. Racism then is when a person believes that they are of greater importance to those of a different race simply because of their skin colour. In the book, Black Like Me, Mr. Griffin who resides in the Deep South attempts to better understand such discrimination. His curiosity to experience life as a black man, led him to many undesired outcomes. This paper will aim to explore the issue of racial equality and justice in the Deep South over the past decades, Mr. Griffin’s growing desire to momentarily live life as a Black Man and the current status and acceptance of Blacks in the Deep South. More importantly, this paper will prove that there has been moderate improvement between races in the Deep South however there is a considerable amount of work that needs to be done. Although there has been moderate progress and many attempts to further unify races over the past decades, there is still a considerable division. It appears that Blacks will be acknowledged as being less important and treated with little respect in our western society. "He who is less than just is less than man" (55). As we have learned from the history of racism in the Deep South, people treat other races poorly not because of a person’s social and moral traits but because of the colour of their skin. This notion is evident in the book, where people refer to it as a “Lack of Unity” (32), showing that there is a clear division between white and black people in all aspects of life. Mr. Griffin’s decision to momentarily change the colour of his skin draws many questions on his reasoning and purpose of this experiment. As we learn early on in the book, Mr. Griffin’s first impressions of being a black man came as a surprise and far exceeded his expectations. Through out the book Mr. Griffin struggled to ‘choose’ his...
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