Black Diaspora Movement

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Between 1945 and 1968, Africans began to make major leaps in progress in securing their independence and protecting their rights. Throughout the globe blacks were rising up and fighting back against oppression and injustices which they were caused to endure for numerous years. During this span of 23 years, the original ruling of Plessy v. Ferguson, which declared that separate but equal was constitutional was overturned in the land mark case of Brown v. Board of Education. Before this even happened though black soldiers who fought in World War 2 came home ready to destroy oppression they faced just like they did in Germany. Even though this major step in the right direction, the people of Africa rose up and gained their independence from their inhabitants such as Britain. Even though some of the African colonies gained independence peacefully, some had to fight tumultuous battles in order to earn their freedom and by 1975 most of the continent had achieved this. Things were moving rapidly and people like Kwame Nkrumah believed that there could one day be a United States of Africa.

To further help these movements in the right direction organizations like the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), and CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) where formed and fought constantly in order make sure that the rights of blacks were protected all over the United States. Leaders/ individuals like Martin Luther King Jr. began to come to the front and lead many people in peace protests/boycotts which eventually helped African Americans gain rights which many take for granted today. For example, Martin Luther King Jr. helped set up a boycott after Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white person in the front of the bus. This boycott caused the Alabama transportation system to lose lots and lots of money, until eventually they broke down and allowed blacks to sit where they wanted to on buses. Other people like W.E.B Dubois...
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