Bilingual Education in the Philippines

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  • Topic: French language, Acute accent, Syllable
  • Pages : 8 (1473 words )
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  • Published : December 31, 2012
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fgaDiacritical marks are symbols added to letters of the alphabet to indicate different pronunciation than the letters are usually given. This article describes the most common diacritical symbols, as well as some punctuation marks commonly used in French, Italian, and Spanish. 

* é - accent acute
* è - accent grave
* ê - circumflex
* ë - umlaut or diaerisis
* ç - cedilla
* ñ - tilde
* ø - streg
* ð - eth (capital form Ð)
* å - bolle
* æ - ligature
* œ - ligature
* ē - macron
* č - háček
* ŭ - crescent
*

The examples given below are ANSI values, as shown in the Windows 3.1 character map. * Diacritical
* Mark Description
* ----------------------------------------------------------------------- *
* acute accent A little diagonal line, used over a vowel. Usually * indicates which syllable is stressed. Slants from upper * right down to lower left. Used in French, Hungarian, * Portuguese, and Spanish. *

* Example: 0225 (accent over lowercase A) *
* breve (BREEV) A curved mark over a vowel. Used to indicate a * short vowel or a short or unstressed syllable. * (Sometimes referred to as a "smiley face.") Used in * Latin and Turkish.

*
* No example in standard Windows character set. *
* caret (CARE-et) The "hat" symbol found on the "6" key. See * also circumflex. Used in French and Portuguese. *
* Example: 0226 (lowercase A with caret above) *
* caron See hacek.
*
* cedilla (sih-DIL-uh) A tiny curved symbol, like a backward "c," * placed at the bottom of a letter to indicate a * different pronunciation (as in the French word * "facade"). Used in French. *

* Example: 0231 (cedilla beneath lowercase C) *
* circumflex A mark such as the caret or tilde, placed over a vowel * to indicate various pronunciations. Used in French and * Polish.

*
* Example: 0226 (circumflex above lowercase A) *
* diaeresis (deye-ER-uh-suhs) The two dots that appear over a vowel * (or dieresis) to show that the vowel is pronounced in a separate * syllable (as in the word "naive," with the diaeresis * over the i). Looks like an umlaut. *

* Example: 0239 (diaeresis above lowercase I) *
* digraph See ligature.
*
* edh (ETH) A letter used in Icelandic and Old English to * (or eth) represent a particular sound, usually "th". Looks * like a "d" tilted to the left, with a horizontal line * across the vertical stroke of the d. *

* Example: 0240
*
* grave accent (GRAYV or GRAHV) The diagonal line that appears above *...
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