Being Modern (Graphic Design)

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Andrew Selivjorstovs 20047803|
Being Modern|
Design, 2nd year, 1st semester. Dr. Cordula Hansen|
8/31/2012|
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Word count 2560
Modernism in Design | Modernism as Culture | Modernist Architect | Modernism Today|

Modernism in Design.
Modernism is a break away from nature, harmony and order. Many modernists believed that if they can separate themselves from the usual way of creating art, they will discover new amazing ways to create new art. They try to embrace discontinuity, and rejects realism.

Main ideas of Modernism were as such
* Cleanliness
* Universality
* Progression
* Efficiency/functionality
* Mass production
Let’s take industrial design as an example. Cleanliness in Modernism means that nothing obstructs you using or viewing the object. For example, if your phone needs to be charged, the flashing light will notify you about that. But what about when your phone is fully charged, do you need the flashing light? Do you even need a light there? We can hide it. That’s how an industrial Modernist would think. And so with age, our appliances became more slick and elegant. Universal means it can do as many tasks as possible. Combining coffee maker with an espresso machine will give you more experience which then can be applied in the same or other areas, progression. And last but not least, Mass Production. Making hundreds copies of an item. Very fast and much, much more cost efficient then making it one by one. That is everything every Modernist strived to be. The beginning for Modernist Art can be traced down to start of the 19th century, just after the Industrial Revolution. You may recognize this painting by Van Gogh, “The Starry Night”. The Starry Night is an Expressionism, one of the styles during Modernism. Even here we can already see how artists try to break free from usual brush strokes and flawless lines. Precisionism

Surreal
There are many different styles that were around during Modernism. Some of the very famous examples are below, which are still used to this day.

Pop Art

So as you can see with the examples above, by creating something that isn’t real, new and bizarre, artists were hoping to find new means and ways of creating art. Take Precisionism style for example, made by Charles Sheeler. It’s overlapping, crooked and uneven buildings. There are no cities like that out there to draw. If there was one like that and artist drew it, it would’ve been realism, but there isn’t one like that. So artist tries to find a new way of drawing something he/she drew before, but in a new way. And because the majority of crafts of art up until Modernism was a fine piece of art from Renaissance time, Modernists had no other choice but do something radical and bizarre to try create new art. The artist could draw it very realistically, but it has been done before, it was of no interest. Finding new ways was the new challenge. And it is easy to see from new ways, that the obvious opposite of natural, flawless and curly is the straight, manmade, cold and calculated.

Modernism as Culture
Modernism is also a movement, a culture within art, architecture and design. What is responsible is Industrial Revolution, which ended in 19th century. With the Industrial Revolution came many technological advances. Such as mass production which caused important changes to the design and invention of Lithography which changed how design was produced. Throughout Modernism time, Europe was at war many times. Revolutions, World War 1, which took place from 1914 to 1918 and World War 2, from 1939 to 1945, which certainly had an effect on artists, designers, film makers, photographers and architects of that time. And to see where and how artists changed, what made them do what they did which shaped modernism as we now know it. I am going to go through crafts that were made during Modernism. It appears that Modernism shows itself to be the most distinct in paintings and...
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