Behaviour Management in the Classroom

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Subject Specific Study. Option Study B: Managing Behaviours in the Learning Environment

|Review a range of factors that may lead to behaviors that disrupt the learning environment |

“… behaviour management difficulties have a way of sneaking up on teachers, leaving them without the necessary tools to deal with the difficulties, never mind the notion of prevention” (Cope, 1999, pg 18)

Good classroom and behaviour management is essential for a lesson to run smoothly. Knowing how to anticipate and manage problems will ensure that students spend maximum time on task, and those students who are eager to learn are not disadvantaged by a few.

I have found there are many different causes of disruptive and inappropriate behavior. These can include factors in and out of a teacher’s control. Factors outside the control of the teacher may include a student’s emotional and psychological factors. A student may have significant distressing issues in their home life such as bereavement or family breakdown for example. Students may also have had negative past experiences at a previous establishment or in the education system in general. Some students may behave inappropriately through boredom or finishing work to quickly, while others misbehave in an attempt to mask undiagnosed learning differences. Conversely, I have experienced students being disruptive in class due to having a special educational need, students with undedicated Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder for example.

‘Some teachers think a well-planned, interesting lesson will by itself prevent disruption. Or that if the teacher is entirely benign and respectful of students, conflict will simply melt away. This isn’t the case.’ (Petty, 2006, pg3)

The teacher themselves can sometimes be a cause of negative behaviour. Some students may act up through boredom as a result of a teacher being unprepared, demotivated or simply not giving enough consideration to lesson design. Bad classroom management can also be a factor, for example, allowing students to play with mobile phones or simply poor seating arrangements, which allow disruptive students to sit together.

|Review organisational policies relevant to managing behaviour in the learning environment identifying any areas for improvement |

Every teaching establishment will have a number of different organizational policies relating to managing behaviour. Appendix A lists the specific policies I have to adhere to in my organisation. The policies are very diverse ranging from a staff code of conduct with pupils, to policies relating to effective teaching and learning. The specialist nature of my establishment means there are many policies linked to the welfare and safeguarding of students, including a number of anti-bullying policies (including anti-cyber bullying) to procedures relating to pastoral care. In my opinion, the behavior management policy in my establishment could be improved. There is no consistent approach to managing behavior throughout the organization. It is left to individual teaching staff to use their discretion as to what constitutes disruptive behavior and how to deal with it accordingly. Although the senior managers are usually supportive of teaching staff, It would be beneficial to staff and students for there to be a set procedure we could all follow.

|Review ways of encouraging behaviours that contribute to an effective learning environment | |Use strategies for encouraging behaviours that contribute to an effective learning environment |

‘…classrooms become much more orderly when rules are stated, or better still negotiated, discussed and fully justified. It seems the little blighters need persuading of...
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