Beauty in November- Poetry Analysis

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The Beauty “In November”
By: Emilie Parsonage
Have you ever seen something that at first glance may look like nothing, but when you dig deeper and deeper into it, you are able to see the true beauty shining through? In the poem, In November by Archibald Lampman, the true beauty of a burned forest is masked by broken ground and charred trees and bush. At first glance, there appears to be nothing remaining but wreckage. However, through the use of personification, visual and kinesthetic imagery and similes, the poet illustrates the theme of finding beauty in all things big and small. Written in a narrative style, the poet forces the reader to see the true beauty of the barren landscape; a landscape waiting, with open arms, to embrace the coming of winter. In November is a narrative poem written from the poet’s point-of-view. The speaker, in this case the poet, describes in depth the setting around him and how he feels in this vacant environment. As he walks through the forest, all he can see around him is what remains from forest fires that left the area broken and barren. The poet speaks of his surroundings in a calming tone letting the reader know that he senses no horror about what he is witnessing. He writes in a way that says even though the forest may be burned and gloomy underneath, all of this is a beautiful place that will once again return to its natural splendour. At first glance you may not realize what the poet is trying to emphasize but once you look more deeply into the meaning of the poem you understand that he is conveying a message of inner beauty; a beauty that exists if we delve deep enough and really seek to see beyond the obvious. The poet uses visual and kinesthetic imagery to emphasize that beauty may be found in the most unexpected places. The visual imagery is shown through his description of the mulleins as “shriveled, thin, gray, haggard and austere” (lines 13-14); plants that remind him of hermit folk (line 17). The plants had...
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