Baseball

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Baseball today has been consider to be known as America national sport. This game has a long history with the country and had many cultural impacts that changed the sport and also help changed the American social view. Baseball has deal with issues from sex, race, war, globalization, depression, and more. To understand how baseball effect the social culture in American we will be focusing around the 1940-50s. During this time period, Americans were having to adjust to the huge changes from World War II.

Before we jump into the 1940’s and 50’s. The history of baseball has been debated by historian of where the origin of the game was from. Some say that it created by Abner Doubleday in Cooperstown, New York. Other will debate that it was from Alexander Joy Cartwright. From my research, Cartwright was the person who developed the rules of baseball in 1845. He played for the New York Knickerbocker Base Ball Club. The rules were based of rounders, which was a European style of the game. Rounders had two different rule which made the difference in the game: first, you could tag the person out with the ball. Second, this led to the change of the type of ball. Since you couldn’t throw the ball at the person anyone more, the ball style turned into a harder ball.

None of these rules were really adopted until the Civil War, when a New York solider and New Jersey solider taught each other their version of baseball. The New York version was considered a hard ball, which allowed players to hit the ball further. While the New Jersey version was considered a soft ball, which gave the player a better chance of hitting the ball. Soon after the Civil War ended the New York version of baseball became the favorite version to play among the soldiers. “In 1853 a revision of the rules prescribed the weight and size of the ball, along with the dimension of the infield specification that have not been significantly altered since that time.” (baseball) Soon after that was established large cities like D.C.; New York; Philadelphia started to create club leagues in their city.

With city teams coming it this led to the creation of the American League and National League. These leagues were just common in the east coast before 1953 when The Boston Braves moved to Milwaukee. Soon after their movies other teams started to move west. This created the “...Pacific Coast League, included Los Angeles Angels, Seattle Rainers, San Diego Padres, Portland Beavers, Oakland Oaks, Sacramento Solons, San Francisco Seals, and Hollywood Stars.” (Krsolovic) Out of these leagues it helped establish the World Series in 1904, where the leagues would get together and play best four out of seven.

Men had always played this game professionally until WWII. Most of the males players took off to fight the war. During this time period, the American society was based on females working and helping the country out, while their boys are fighting on the other side of the word. Now the women didn’t work all the time, since baseball had grown so popular. Thank you, Mr. Babe Ruth. “Female athletes played int the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGBL) between 1943 and 1954. Over 600 women displayed their athletic skills in the AAGPBL.” (Cullen) These numbers soon started to go down when the war ended and man were coming back into the game. Even though the game play for females were short , this created a social view that women were able to be athletic like men were and helped created the view of Rosie the Riveter during WWII.

When the United States entered WWII, few major league baseball executives started to find ways to keep baseball alive for the public. This created the AAGBL, but the rules and regulation were totally different from the Major League of Baseball (MLB). “Ball was 12 inch in circumference, pitcher’s mount was forty feet from the plate, pitchers had to throw underhand, and distance between bases was sixty-five feet. “ (Cullen) Not only...
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