Atomic Bomb - Hiroshima

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In August 1945 the United States military and political leaders dreaded a bloody invasion of the Japanese main land, but few believed it couldn’t be avoided. On august 6th 1945 the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later, they dropped a second one on another Japanese city, Nagasaki. Those two bombs were first and only atomic weapons ever used in actual combat. Until atomic bombs were reported in “The New York Times”, most American citizens had never heard of atomic bombs. Ordinary bombs had been an important part of World War II, and they brought much destruction to both sides. This atomic bomb, the equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT, flattened the city.

Today, many people question the wisdom of having used the atomic bombs against Japan. In 1945, during the desperate struggles to end the war and bring their servicemen home, the news of the atomic bomb were greeted with rejoicing. Few people understood that the bombs would keep American soldiers from the dreaded mainland invasion. Though the reporting after the bombs were dropped was as honest as it could be, the whole development project had been shrouded in absolute secrecy. Because if this, and the amount of destruction the atomic bombs brought, it was months and years before American’s could understood the full impact of those bombs on the Japanese and on the world. Even the crew that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima was unprepared for the extent of the damage. The crew knew they were flying a special weapon from the Pacific island of Tinian to the city of Hiroshima, but no one used the words atomic bomb.

There were seven B-29s assigned to the mission, three as weather planes, one as a stand-by, two to carry scientific equipment and the observers, and the Enola Gay to carry the bomb. Enola Gay was named after the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, after his mother. The atomic bomb was named “little boy”. "Little Boy" was created using uranium-235, a radioactive isotope of...
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