Art Deco Designs in Todays Designs

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Access to HE: Art & Design 2013
Word count: 2716

Has Art Deco influenced the designs of today?

By
Craig Lee Jones

Access to HE: Art & Design 2013
Word count: 2716

Has Art Deco influenced the designs of today?

By
Craig Lee Jones

List of pictures cited in this essay

Page4Eiffel Tower with Citroen logo in 1925
Page5Howard Carter excavating Tutankhamen in 1922
Page6Busby Berkeley choreography
Page7French Line travel poster of the Ile de France
Page 8Mies van de Rohe Barcelona chair
Page9Four Seasons of Las Vegas bedroom
Page10Chrysler Airflow Coupe in cream & Rolls Royce Art Deco Poster Page11Marcel Bouraine’s (1928) Papillion a winged figure in a jade glass & A view of the Art Deco inspired cockpit of the Rolls Royce Page12Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water 1935

Page13BioShock Front Cover
Page14L. A. Noire Cover

Has Art Deco influenced the designs of today?
Introduction

Art Deco has fueled, influenced, inspired and guided most of the designs we consider as ‘modern’ or ‘simplistic’ today. One has to look at a brief overview of Art Deco, including the ancient arts and history, also what was occurring during the movement and the world’s biggest influences. The Art Deco era made way for mass culture people doing or wanting the same things. It was also the birth of the mass production of luxury goods not just for the wealthy, but also for the general people. One also has to look at what elements designers of today have used from the Art Deco era to create new, simplistic and modern designs. One will look also at the architecture from the era and look at one of the most famous Art Deco architects Frank Lloyd Wright. One will review modern video games that have been created in the style of the Art Deco era and how successful the games have been.

The ‘roaring twenties’ was where it all started;
‘…a world dominated by a desire for speed, luxury and opulence.’ (Gallagher, Jeffrey, Andrews, & White, 2000)

Art Deco started in 1925 Paris Exposition entitled Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes. It was a display of modern decorative art, where designers from all corners of the globe came to display their modern inspirations which, was the exhibition regulations. However, several designers were reluctant to forget their tradition. There were over 16 million visitors to the exhibition and it was the first major point in the Art Deco movement. The Citroën logo was displayed on the Eifel Tower that transformed the 19th century triumph of engineering into a 20th century advertisement for consumerism. Germany and USA were not represented in their full capacity at the exhibition. Naturally France had their reservations about Germany because they were the main aggressors of WWI. The USA declined to participate on the grounds that 'there was no modern design in America' (V&A South Kensington, 2003). In contrast, Art Deco had a massive impact on art and design in America. Streamlining, clean lines, and strong curves were the main American contributions to Art Deco.

Art Deco became a movement in its own right. It was not until the 1960s when it was actually named Art Deco. This saw clear partnerships between architects, designers, and craftsmen in the new Modernist and Art Deco-style buildings and apartments. Furniture manufacturers, metal workers, ceramic factories and the textile industry produced items which, when placed together, would create an overall coherent scheme for a room or buildings. (Citron, Mitofsky Antiques) Pre...
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