Aravind Eye Hospital

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Case: Aravind Eye Hospital

* What is Aravind’s mission? How successful is Aravind at achieving its mission? The mission is to bring eyesight to the masses of poor people in India, Asia, Africa and all over the world. To provide quality care as a non-profit eye hospital. To spread the Aravind model and offer hope in all parts of the world. Aravind has grown from a 20-bed hospital in 1976 to 1224 beds in 1992 as one of the biggest hospitals of its kind in the world. The Aravind organization consisted of main hospitals that charged for fees, free hospitals, eye camps, IOL factories with sponsors and volunteer organizations from all over the world.

* What are the key factors that have led to Aravind’s success? What has Dr. V’s role been in creating that success? What challenges does Aravind currently face? * Key factors: Dr. V was inspired by Mahatman Gandhi and philosopher Swami Aurobindo, dedication through professional lives to serve humanity and God * Dr.V’s spiritual belief and committed to the mission of the hospital * Dr. V inspired his family and professionals to push the mind and body to its highest effort levels, worked twice as hard for half of the salary. * Dr. V has been the driving force behind the hospital * 90% of annual budget is self-generated, 10% from sources around the world, such as Royal Commonwealth Society for the Blind (UK) and the SEVA Foundation (USA). * Expend all surplus on modernizing and updating equipment and facilities with the generosity support from local business community * Spiritual approach sustaining the mission at Aravind * Challenges: franchising the model and spreading it around the world.

* What type of customers do the free and paying hospitals serve? What are the similarities and differences in the service and care provided at the free and paying hospitals? Free Hospitals:
* Outpatient facilities were not as organized, crowded and cramped rooms * Poorer patients, more commotion, longer wait
* ICCE type surgeries, not as well equipped
* No beds to recuperate and recover, 6 x 3 bamboo/coir mat spread out on the floor as a bed and small sized pillow. 20-30 patients with self-contained bathroom facilities * Detailed records were kept of all post-operative complications, such as iritis Paying Hospitals:

* Patients paid for the services, Rs 500 to Rs 1000. With IOL implant total cost Rs 1500 to 2500 * Operation rooms were conducted in an efficient manner, well-paced, routine way The customers at the free hospitals are poorer compared to the paying hospital

* What issues does Dr. V. face in achieving his goal of “mass-marketing” cataract surgery throughout India and to the other parts of the world? What recommendations would you make to Dr. V. to help him achieve his goal? * India has the second largest population after China, with 20 million blind eyes and another 2 million added annually. With the per-capita income Rs 6800 who couldn’t afford private treatment, $200 million would be required to overcome the blindness problem just in the country. * Despite the effort in eye camps and surgery camps in remote areas, villagers are not responsive to treatment due to various reasons, such as fear of surgery, can’t afford food and transportation. Lack of organizational skills, creating propaganda, organizing logistics. Recommendations:

* I would recommend that putting a protocol in place by establishing step by step procedures and instructions. Assign a training sector for building eye camps, surgery camps, sponsors and volunteer groups. Regulations and rules must be applied to all areas in order to provide standards and consistencies in quality eye care. Well run group such as the Dindigul group can assist other camps and lead the initiative. To reach the general audience and promote the Aravind mission through public media, such as TV, internet and newspaper or...
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