Anton Chekhov- the Lottery Ticket

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Anton Chekhov- the Lottery Ticket

By | Jan. 2013
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Thematic Essay: The Lottery Ticket by Anton Chekhov
Anton Chekhov was very talented in that he could convey well the emotion and the suspense with each and every situation of his stories. In Anton Chekhov's short story, "The Lottery Ticket", Ivan Dmitritch and his wife imagine the vast splendors that would come had they won the lottery. Shown in this condensed work, Ivan and his wife realize that they have changing attitudes toward each other and their all important family.

In the beginning, Ivan Dmitritch, with nothing to do, looks up the lottery draw in the newspaper, even though he usually does not. Then, when he finds that the series number is correct, he and his wife go into a daze of imagination of what they will do with the 75,000 rubles. Finally, Ivan looks at the number following the series, and it is wrong. He is maddened by how he lives now, as everything seems smaller and darker now that he has imagined living large.

Ivan starts to think out loud the possibilities, but his train of thought seems to be a one-way conversation. He does not share his joy and excitement with his wife, but goes off at a tangent imagining what he will do with the money. It is very important to take note of the first few lines of the short story- and remember that it is actually his wife's ticket. "......."I forgot to look at the newspaper today," his wife said to him as she cleared the table. "Look and see whether the list of drawings is there."......."

Ivan's wife does add to his daydream, but merely to endorse his spending choices at first. Then she realizes what is going on in Ivan's head. The contentment they had in other's company is turning to frustration and anger as they realize their very different attitudes. Ivan's thoughts dwell on the ways in which the people who are supposed to matter to him might now be obstacles in his way, preventing him from getting what he wants. "......She had her own daydreams, her own plans, her own reflections; she understood...