Antigone by David Greene

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THE QUALITIES OF CREON As readers, we have to make judgments and interpretations of different characters. In
the book, Antigone, translated by David Greene, there is a character by the name of
Creon. While reading Antigone, some important descriptions about Creon become
apparent. He views himself as the perfect leader, believes he is always correct, and wants
control over people.

Creon believes he is the only perfect ruler for Thebes. He believes that he can create a
better city with his presence: "I would not be silent if I saw ruin,…" (p.168 l.203-204).
"I would not count any enemy of my country as a friend-" (p.168 l.205-206). He further
continues by stating "I will make her greater still" (p.168 l.210). In this last quote Creon
declares that he will improve the city (she) by his rulings. Creon describes how his
qualities make him a good ruler and how he would act in different situations.
Furthermore, Creon views himself a good leader because he believes he has the best
attributes and no one can compare to him. Creon shows his over-confidence when he
boasts of his role as the perfect ruler of Thebes.

In addition, Creon believes he is always correct in his judgments and his beliefs.
Before the sentry even explains the event that has occurred, the sentry states that
he is only a messenger and that he has not committed the act. Yet Creon still accuses
the sentry of receiving money for the act and threatens to punish him. "That will teach
you in the days to come from what you may draw profit…ill-gotten gains ruin more than
they save" (p.172-173 l.342-346). Creon does not think logically that the sentry would
not turn himself in for such an impious act. Consequently, the Chorus suggests that the
act may have been...
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