Annotated Bibliography

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Annotated Bibliography

Hoeveler, Diane Long. "The Hidden God and the Abjected Woman in 'The Fall of the House of Usher.'" Studies in Short fiction (Summer, 1992) Vol.29 Issue 3, p.385, 11p. 2005, Oct.6. http://search.epnet.com.login.ezproxy.library.ualberta.ca/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=9705041515>

In her article the Hidden God and the Abjected Woman in "The Fall of the House of Usher," Diane Hoeveler suggests that Poe makes reference to the Vigilae Mortuorum for a specific purpose. She discusses the idea that he chose a text that would reflect his own with it's specific historical, sexual and religious connotations. Hoeveler mentions that the vigil mirrors Roderick's relationship with his sister in the deeper explanation and historical weight of the word Magunitae, and how this meaning brings out Madeline as Roderick's double, not only in his psyche, but also as a historical ideation of the cyclical nature of generations.

Timmerman, John H. "House of Mirrors: Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Fall of the House of Usher.'" Papers on Language & Literature (Summer 2003) Vol.39 Issue 3, p227, 18p. 2005, Oct.6.

In his article House of Mirrors: Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher," John Timmerman suggests that Poe's destructive theories are but a result of a disrupted balance between romanticism and enlightenment. Timmerman explains the importance and implication of mirrors within "The Fall of the House of Usher" to support his theory; that Roderick is the embodiment of romanticism, and Madeline his foil of enlightenment. While the two are separated psychologically, they mirror the mansion's physical separation- the fissure- that is the sole cause of the unstable foundation. Timmerman examines the deep interconnectedness of the discordant nature of the mansion to its inhabitants, and their mutual destruction.
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