Analyzing the Writing of Annie Dilard

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Analyzing the writing of Annie Dillard
An analysis of seeing

Analyzing the writing of Annie Dillard An Analysis of Seeing

What is seeing? According to the New Edition Webster’s Dictionary seeing can be defined as having the power of sight or to view with one’s eyes. This definition describes one aspect of seeing; it does not give a thorough explanation of this controversial, concept. I am a senior in high school and I am in a sophisticated college class where I was charged with obtaining the answer to this question. However my perception was weak, I failed to answer this question effectively and the answer haunted my mind like an apparition from beyond the grave. Thus, I ask once again, what is seeing? The immaculate, answer was perfectly wrapped in the second chapter of Annie Dillard’s Book Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. I have reread this chapter, at least a million times, searching for more. More literary devices, more subliminal messages, more persuasive techniques, elaborate vocabulary, incomparable writing style and sentence structure. I wanted more: It is such an intoxicating feeling when an individual such as Annie Dillard can reach within the furthest corners of the mind and alter an entire concept; a concept that I thought to have mastered over my brief time on earth. As Bill Cosby said “Every closed eye is not sleeping, and every open eye is not seeing.” One does not simply read Annie Dillard’s work; it is not a piece to be taken lightly. The extraordinary arrangement of each word, each punctuation mark carefully chosen as one picks ripened fruit from a tree. She introduces the chapter with a very peculiar way; the words “when I was six or seven years old” present her as a very active individual in her youth. This is apparent and continues throughout the chapter. As a child she was able to see the value in a copper...
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