Analysis of Edna Pontellier

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 680
  • Published : December 20, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Character Analysis of Edna Pontellier

Edna Pontellier was a very respectable woman from the 1800's that was unsatisfied with her situation in life. Mrs. Pontellier was a mother of two sons and had a husband whom she adored at the beginning of their marriage, but overtime they have became distant and her sexual desires were no longer being fulfilled. She soon broke the role society had casted upon her and became rebellious by leaving her womanly duties behind. Kate Chopin reveals Edna Pontellier's character through the her actions, through dialogue, and by telling the reader the thoughts and feelings that are circulation through Mrs. Pontellier.

Actions define a person's character and through Edna Pontellier's actions the reader can better understand her character. Throughout the book Mrs. Pontellier's actions have showed the reader that she really does love her family, but she is miserable. Kate Chopin shows the reader that Edna Pontellier is miserable and independent by having Edna move out of the main house, having an affair with her husband, and by having her take her own life at the end of the book. For example, Kate Chopin writes, "Mademoiselle, I am going to move away from my house on Esplanade" (page ). The authors choice to have Edna Pontellier leave the comfort of her home and move to a new house symbolizes that she is trying to leave her old life behind her and this makes the future look bright for Mrs. Pontellier. This is not the case, it actually leads to her inevitable death. Edna Pontellier's actions are not the only thing that describes her character, dialogue is also used to describe Mrs. Pontellier. chapter 26

Dialogue between people can often reveal a lot about a person. Throughout the novel Edna Pontellier revealed a lot about herself while talking to other characters. Edna Pontellier reveals herself most when she is talking to Mademoiselle Reisz. For Example, Kate Chopin writes,

"This is not your true reason, ma belle. There...
tracking img