Amazon: Rain Forest

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Introduction

Body - The Amazon Rainforest’s Vegetation, Species, Climate

1 Amazon’s Vegetation

1 Deforestation

1 Human Influence

2 Soil Quality

1 Plant Adaptation

3 Universal Dependence

1 Oxygen Production

2 Lumber Production

4 Plant Species

1

2 Animal Species

1 Primates

1 Howler Monkey

2 Squirrel Monkey

3 Uakari Monkey

2 Mammals

1 Amazon Manatee

2 Pink River Dolphin

3 Anteater

4 Slow-moving sloth

5 Peccary

6 Capybara

3 Reptiles

1 Bushmaster

2 Alligator (Caiman)

3 Sea Turtle

4 Invertebrates

1 Leaf cutter ant

2 Cockroaches

3 Termites

5 Birds

1 Toucan

2 Macaw

3 Harpy Eagle

3 Climate

1 Normal Climate

2 Changes in Climate

1 Human influence

Conclusion

    Rainforests have been around for thousands of years serving as a vital source for humans, animals, plants, and other organisms. Specifically, the Amazon Rainforest is one of the most essential geographical features because it is the largest rainforest in the world. People mistake the Amazon Rainforest as another wooded area, but the Amazon Rainforest is the biggest provider of oxygen due to its broad vegetation, and it also has a wide variety of species and a constant climate.     The Amazon Rainforest is composed of an abundant number of vegetation made up of a wide variety of trees such as, Myrtle, Laurel, Palm, and Acacia, as well as Rosewood, Brazil Nut, and Rubber Tree. In the 20th century, people began settling in the major areas of the Amazon Rainforest (Britannica.com). Settlers began to cut down trees to obtain lumber and to create grazing pastures and farmland, shrinking down the vegetation dramatically (Britannica.com). In response to this, in the 1900’s, the government of Brazil and various international bodies began efforts to maintain the rainforest and protect it from any danger (Britannica.com). The Rainforest’s soil also suffers some difficulties. In fact, the quality of the soil is so poor that the useful nutrients are only found in the top two inches (Kulkarni). The soil is very thin and low in minerals because only about one percent of the sunlight that strikes the top of the trees may make it through the ground (Nowicki 464). Therefore, the trees in the Amazon depend on the dead trees and animal remains to provide the soil with nutrients and minerals (Kulkarni). The vegetation in this majestic Rainforest is also critical as a universal resource.   “The forest, know as Amazonia, is called the ‘Lungs of Earth’ as it produces 20% of the total oxygen in the world…it’s the largest ecosystem on earth” (Kulkani). In addition, the Amazonia is also home to an excellent timber obtained from the Mahogany and the Amazon Cedar. This timber is very valuable and useful, thus it’s sought in other countries. When the people of Brazil realized how important timber was for other countries, they decided to export it to other countries in order to boost their economy (Britannica.com). This and some other exports actually helped Brazil rank the richest country in South America (rain-tree.com).     The Amazon Rainforest contains a variety of species ranging from those that are commonly seen, to those animals whose names are impossible to pronounce. Scientists estimate that half of the species of the world are found here (Blueplanet.com). “Over 500 mammals, 175 lizards and over 300 other reptiles’ species and one third of the world's birds live in Amazonia” (Blueplanet.com). Most of the primates that exist today are found in the Amazon, because, as a matter of fact, about 75 of the 250 primate species live here (Duffy). An example of an Amazonian primate is the squirrel monkey. These creatures are believed to be one of the most peaceful animals in the Wild. Insects and fruits is the main diet of this animal (Duffy). In general, they are white...
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