Aix Commands You Should Not Leave Home Without

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AIX commands you should not leave home without

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AIX commands you should not leave home without
Level: Intermediate Shiv Dutta, Senior Software Engineer, IBM 06 May 2003 Updated 24 Oct 2006 Do you ever feel you wish you could answer some of your own questions when you work with AIX® and your System p™ server? Do you ever feel you could save time by not having to call on the support professionals all the time? Well, wish no more. Shiv Dutta discusses some of the AIX commands that answer those questions and tells you how to enlarge the list of such answers.

Introduction
As you know, AIX® has a vast array of commands that enable you to do a multitude of tasks. Depending on what you need to accomplish, you use only a certain subset of these commands. These subsets differ from user to user and from need to need. However, there are a few core commands that you commonly use. You need these commands either to answer your own questions or to provide answers to the queries of the support professionals. In this article, I'll discuss some of these core commands. The intent is to provide a list that you can use as a ready reference. While the behavior of these commands should be identical in all releases of AIX, they have been only tested under AIX 5.3. Note: The bootinfo command discussed in the following paragraphs is NOT a user-level command and is NOT supported in AIX 4.2 or later.

Commands
Kernel
How would I know if I am running a 32-bit kernel or 64-bit kernel? To display if the kernel is 32-bit enabled or 64-bit enabled, type: bootinfo -K

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-dutta_cmds.html

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AIX commands you should not leave home without

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How do I know if I am running a uniprocessor kernel or a multiprocessor kernel? /unix is a symbolic link to the booted kernel. To find out what kernel mode is running, enter ls -l /unix and see what file /unix it links to. The following are the three possible outputs from the ls -l /unix command and their corresponding kernels: /unix -> /usr/lib/boot/unix_up /unix -> /usr/lib/boot/unix_mp /unix -> /usr/lib/boot/unix_64 # 32 bit uniprocessor kernel # 32 bit multiprocessor kernel # 64 bit multiprocessor kernel

Note: AIX 5L Version 5.3 does not support a uniprocessor kernel. How can I change from one kernel mode to another? During the installation process, one of the kernels, appropriate for the AIX version and the hardware in operation, is enabled by default. Let us use the method from the previous question and assume the 32-bit kernel is enabled. Let us also assume that you want to boot it up in the 64-bit kernel mode. This can be done by executing the following commands in sequence: ln -sf /usr/lib/boot/unix_64 ln -sf /usr/lib/boot/unix_64 bosboot -ad shutdown -r /dev/hdiskxx /unix /usr/lib/boot/unix

The /dev/hdiskxx directory is where the boot logical volume /dev/hd5 is located. To find out what xx is in hdiskxx, run the following command: lslv -m hd5

Note: In AIX 5.2, the 32-bit kernel is installed by default. In AIX 5.3, the 64-bit kernel is installed on 64-bit hardware and the 32-bit kernel is installed on 32bit hardware by default.

Hardware
How would I know if my machine is capable of running AIX 5L Version 5.3? AIX 5L Version 5.3 runs on all currently supported CHRP (Common Hardware Reference Platform)-based POWER hardware. How would I know if my machine is CHRP-based?

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-dutta_cmds.html

03/12/2007

AIX commands you should not leave home without

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Run the prtconf command. If it's a CHRP machine, the string chrp appears on the Model Architecture line. How would I know if my System p machine (hardware) is 32-bit or 64-bit? To display if the hardware is 32-bit or 64-bit, type: bootinfo -y

How much real memory does my machine have? To display real memory in kilobytes (KB), type one of the following: bootinfo -r

lsattr -El sys0...
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