Adoption in Homosexual Couples

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Abstract
There are currently more than 410,000 children in foster care according to the United States Department of Health & Human Services. Under Florida law, homosexual persons are allowed to serve as foster parents or guardians, but are barred from being considered for adoptive parents. All other persons are eligible to be considered case-by-case to be adoptive parents, but not homosexual persons — even where the adoptive parent is a fit parent and the adoption is in the best interest of the children. There is no evidence that shows that having gay parents is harmful to a child. Some people argue that raising a heterosexual child in a gay home can give the child an unclear view of sexuality. But unfortunately, there are not enough married heterosexual couples that are interested in adopting a child. Should we ignore the fact that hundreds of thousands of children currently in foster care will grow up alone, unhappy, without having an opportunity to find out what family is? I strongly support the idea that all children deserve the chance to be a member of a loving and nurturing family unit.

ADOPTION IN HOMOSEXUAL COUPLES

How many times have we heard that a child needs to be raised by both a mother and a father? I know I have probably heard that phrase more than a hundred times. While I used to think that a child being raised by homosexual parents was a huge mistake, I now confidently believe that this action is far from being wrong. Society seems to believe that the qualities contributed by a man and a woman are extremely essential to raising a well-rounded individual. For many, the idea of having two fathers or two mothers is simply unacceptable. Well, what about a child that has no parents? Will that child be able to grow up to be a well-rounded individual? Is now where an important question develops: Is two people of the same sex raising a child more harmful to a child’s development than no parental guidance at all? For most people, the answer is yes. Laws prohibiting adoption by gay and lesbian couples exist in numerous states across the United States as well as in many other countries. It is very important that this issue is brought to an end as these bans do more than prohibit same-sex couples from starting families; they sentence children to be alone for life in a world where plenty of qualified adoptive parents exist.

LGBT adoption is the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons. This may be in the form of a joint adoption by a same-sex couple, adoption by one partner of a same-sex couple of the other's biological child (step-parent adoption), and adoption by a single LGBT person. Under Florida law, homosexual persons are allowed to serve as foster parents or guardians, but are barred from being considered for adoptive parents. All other persons are eligible to be considered case-by-case to be adoptive parents, but not homosexual persons — even where, as here, the adoptive parent is a fit parent and the adoption is in the best interest of the children. Florida Statute 63.042 allows any minor or adult to be adopted by married or unmarried adults. This includes anyone capable of “serving as an effective parent.” ADOPTION IN HOMOSEXUAL COUPLES

But it also states: “No person eligible to adopt under this statute may adopt if that person is a homosexual.” The law’s many critics pointed out its contradictions. Florida law doesn’t prevent gay persons from being foster parents, but bars them from adopting their own foster children. Florida’s 1977 legislative prohibition against gay adoption was enacted at the height of the anti-gay crusade of Anita Bryant, American singer, former Miss Oklahoma beauty pageant winner, outspoken critic of homosexuality and spokeswoman for the Florida Citrus Commission. In that same year, Dade County, Florida passed an ordinance sponsored by Anita Bryant's former good friend...
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