Adapting Communication

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TDA 3.5 CS/RA adapting communication with adults

TDA 3.5.3 AC 3.2a 3.2b 3.2c
Please note
This is a case study however if you have experience of any of these in your real practice then you need to include in this piece or evidence for those circumstances below that you can show real practice for describing:

‘What you actually did and also reflect on ‘how it went’ ‘what you might do differently in the future’ eg you may have actual experience adapting your communication for an adult with English as an additional language

You must make it clear which are case study examples and which are actual examples of your real practice

A/You have a family move into the area and they have recently arrived from Poland and speak very little English. The parents want to arrange a meeting with you to discuss their child’s first few weeks in the setting and how they have settled.

How can you support their understanding and interact with them during this meeting.

It is fully understandable that the family would want a meeting to ensure that their child is settling in to a new school. When the meeting is arranged I would ask the parents if they knew anybody that could come with them whose could help me communicate more effectively with them. I would also ask them when would be convenient to them this I think would make them feel that I understood family life is busy and I wanted to make it as easy for them as possible. I would also ask them if they were happy just to see me or would also like the child’s class teacher to attend. For the case study I will state that the parents were happy with just to see me. The meeting is to be held after school so it seems to make sense to hold it in the child’s classroom this would give the parents the opportunity to see the environment the child is in and also maybe look at any work displayed that their child or other children have done…this would be to show them that the school celebrates the children’s work which would give encouragement to the parents. How the seating is set up is very important I think to sit behind a desk for such a meeting is wrong as it is too formal and I think that informality is important as I want to be seen as an open communicator who does not have to be sat behind a desk. This also lets them see me as a whole, I would ensure that I sat in a friendly an open way by not folding my arms; I would sit slightly leaning forward as it shows I am interested on their thoughts. Legs need to be tucked in with knees together keeps things tidy. Eye contact where appropriate shows interest. For a first meeting a formal introduction is needed I would tell them my full name and my full job title and give a brief and clear synopsis of what my role within the classroom is, this would give them an idea of who is talking to them and an understanding of how I can best support their child with transition into a new school. I would also ask them how they would like me to address them. With English not being their strongest language I world speak slowly and clearly without a patronising tone and ask them regularly if they understood what I was saying this would benefit them as it would be clearly saying that I want them to ask as I want them to understand for the interest of their child and them. I would show them any work their child had done and be positive about any achievements their child had made. If I had any concerns I would be sensitive but would let them know as I believe its best not to let things fester, this also gives them the opportunity it be supportive at home in a particular area. Listening to what they have to say gives some control to them and shows that their opinions and views matter and are respected. Consideration of any cultural differences will be anticipated and treated respectfully. At the end of the meeting I would quickly go over the main points to reinforce understanding and ask them for their thoughts as parental...
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