Act of Supremacy 1534

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Act of Supremacy 1534

By | March 2013
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Anglophones worlds

Henry VIII’s Act of Supremacy (1534)

The act of supremacy is a legal document passed in the sixth session of the reformation Parliament in November –December 1534.
1.2 Context
Henry VIII (1491–1547), reigned 1509–47. He was the second Tudor monarch after his father Henry VII. Ascended to the throne of England in 1509 after his elder brother, Arthur died, becoming the next in line to the throne. At that moment the country was Catholic and was controlled by the Pope in Rome. Henry had six wives (Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Katherine Parr); he executed two and divorced two. His first divorce, from Catherine of Aragon, was opposed by the Pope, leading to England’s break with the Roman Catholic Church

In the establishment of the protestant faith in England, the English Reformation, there were several Key changes during the 1530s. Between 1531 to 1535 Henry obtained a series of act of Parliament, replacing the Pope’s power over the church of England with his own, and declaring it treason to oppose this step. The break with Roman church was catalysed with the Act of Supremacy in 1534 when the act in Parliament declared Henry VIII the Supreme Head on Earth of the Church of England.

The origins of the break with Rome are to be found in the 1520s. By 1527 Henry wanted to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. The main reason why Henry wanted to end the marriage that had lasted for eighteen years could vary depending on the view of the historian, Some propose that he wanted to end a marriage that he believed to be against God’s will; Others that he wanted a new wife who provide him a legitimate heir, (Catherine wasn’t able to do), a male heir to carry forward the Tudor dynasty; and others support that he had fallen in love with Ann Boleyn.

He seek for an annulment from the highest authority, the Pope and asked Thomas Wolsey , Henry’s first great minister to use...