Abortion Essay

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Sean Woods
Professor Hunt
Ethics 304
1/21/2013
Abortion Essay To draw a line in the sand and say this is when a person becomes a person is arbitrary. The argument in itself is supercilious to me but it still has its moral context, yet there is a bigger picture to abortions. If we all agree that a fetus is a person or an egg is a person, there is still an ethical decision to be made, and there is still the consequence of your actions to be considered. Abortion affects the future life of someone soon to be, so there is still a consequence to be taken into consideration, but there are certain circumstances that make abortion justified. In this essay, I am using a utilitarian approach to argue that abortions are permissible, under certain circumstances pertaining to the future well-being of the child or mother. The question of whether it is a person should shift to whether or not the child will have a healthy upbringing. The greater benefit of all is that children should be born in a healthy environment with physical and mental health taken into account. Making abortions illegal does not change the circumstances that contribute to it.

Crime is a Significant Circumstance In the mid-1990s, there was a major decrease in crime in America, and there were a lot of speculations as to why this happened. A few suspicions were a stronger police force, harsher jail sentences, and a strong economy. There were many debates as to why crime had fallen when it should have risen. As stated by Steven D. Levitt “leading experts were predicting an explosion in crime in the early and mid-1990s, precisely the point when crime rates began to plunge. Although experts failed to anticipate the decline, there has been no shortage of hypotheses to explain the drop in crime after the fact” (163). Most of the speculations surrounding the drop in crime do not accurately portray the truth of why it happened. Levitt suggested there was some evidence of a connection between abortions and a drop in crime: The U.S. Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 may seem like an unlikely source of the decline in crime in the 1990s, but a growing body of evidence suggests an important role for legalized abortion in explaining falling crime rates two decades later. The underlying theory rests on two premises: 1) unwanted children are at greater risk for crime, and 2) legalized abortion leads to a reduction in the number of unwanted births (182). In the studies conducted by Rolf Loeber and Magda Stouthamer-Loeber in “Family Factors as Correlates and Predictors of Juvenile Conduct Problems and Delinquency”, having a child in a negative home environment with family members who engage in criminal activities can lead to delinquency. These studies show the deteriorating effects of an unwanted child can lead to delinquency. If the mother does not want the child or is unable to provide the child with the attention he needs then there is an adverse effect of delinquency leading to a life of crime and antisocial behavior. Forcing a woman to have a child she does not want could cause that child to have an unhappy upbringing, which could in turn lead to criminal behavior in adulthood. According Joseph Murray and David P. Farrington, a great deal has been learned from longitudinal surveys about risk factors for CD and delinquency. Offenders differ significantly from nonoffenders in many respects, including impulsiveness, low IQ, low school achievement, poor parental supervision, punitive or erratic parental discipline, cold parental attitude, child physical abuse, parental conflict, disrupted families, antisocial parents, large family size, low family income, antisocial peers, high delinquency rate schools, and high crime neighborhoods (639). To eliminate this unhappy future for the mother and the child, abortion might just be the answer, and it could help keep...
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