A Storm in a Teacup

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A storm in a teacup
People are quite unpredictable. One minute they are sweet, the other they are ready to punch you in the gut. Of course, the anger or worry has to come out from somewhere, meaning that something caused the emotions one feels. However, sometimes there is a flaw in this circle of cause and effect. It is called a storm in a teacup. So, what is it and why is it called that way? First, a storm in a teacup is an idiomatic expression which means that someone has a lot of unnecessary anger and worry about a matter that is not important. Or maybe it is important, yet not so much as to make such a big fuss about it. And one can see these things almost in everyday situations. For example, we Lithuanians have quite the feature to nag about something, anything: job, money, health, mood, time, place, etc. The things we like to nag about goes on and on. And the worst part is that the things we complain about are really not that big of a deal. This kind of behavior is not present in foreign countries, though. Even so, I am surprised that we do not have an expression like “a storm in a teacup” in Lithuanian (at least not to my knowledge) Finally, I like how this idiom represents how small things are made into a big fuss. And I see how it may have originated: If you drop a sugar cube into a cup of tea from enough height, the water in the tea will splash violently in all directions; the perfect representation of a storm which happened in a teacup. So, we really ought to be more aware of our problems whether they are relatively important or not, because hearing people complaining about miniscule things is annoying.
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